Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Cassie, Jonathan (2016), Level Up Your Classroom: The Quest to Gamify Your Lessons and Engage Your Students, ASCD, Retrieved on 2017-03-10
Folksonomies: education gamification

Memes

10 MAR 2017

 What We Learn from Games

What also went unremarked was how much I was learning by playing these games: basic ideas such as taking turns and developing patience while others completed their turns, the strengthening of simple memory, improved physical coordination, an ability to recognize and act on patterns, the capacity to see what might happen in a few turns if I took one move as opposed to another, resilience when losing, and the kind of strategic thinking that emerges once you realize that Scrabble is both a game ...
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10 MAR 2017

 Six Fundamental Properties of Games

All games are in some way a combination of the four “mother” mechanics: agon, alea, mimicry, and ilinx. Games have strict rules that all players must follow. Game-winning conditions are clearly defined. There are many different ways a game can end—not just one. In other words, there’s a way to win and (usually) lots of ways to lose. Players try hard to win because winning is desirable. Games can be played repeatedly with different outcomes.
Folksonomies: gaming
Folksonomies: gaming
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Four Game Mechanics

Agon: This ancient Greek word—meaning “struggle” or “contest”— defines those games in which some aspect of a player’s or team’s skill is measured against another player or team. Any game that is based on skill and eliminates luck is a game of agon. The best examples of this type of game are athletic games such as wrestling and baseball. The games of chess and checkers are also classic examples of agon. Contemporary abstract strategy games, such as those in the Project GIPF ser...
Folksonomies: games gaming mechanics
Folksonomies: games gaming mechanics
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 The Magic Circle

Game rules, therefore, create a kind of artificial reality in which those rules exclude other equally valid or defensible rules. In other words, there is no place for a chess piece in backgammon, baseball isn’t played with a hockey puck, a player can’t die in Candy Land, and there are no sugarplum fairies (to date) in World of Warcraft. The way each game’s rules and equipment combine to define the unique experience of playing that particular game is referred to by theorists as the magic...
Folksonomies: concepts gaming
Folksonomies: concepts gaming
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Game-Based VS Gamified

Broadly speaking, those who advocate for game-based education seek to find ways to integrate specific, preexisting games directly into the curriculum. They want to use games to illustrate specific points or develop specific skills that they believe are uniquely developed by the game in question (Prensky, 2001). There are many fine games that could be incorporated into a host of curricula that would help students learn more and develop more sophisticated skills, and they can be played as is ou...
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10 MAR 2017

 The Case for the Gamified Classroom

Gamified instruction empowers students to own their learning. Students who learn in a gamified classroom have a better capacity for persistence. Gamified instruction helps students develop a capacity for selfdirection. Gamified classrooms impart critical social skills. Gamification of learning enables students to build and sustain learning communities. Gamified instruction is inherently democratic and meritocratic and hence encourages risk taking. Gamified instruction helps students maintain ...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Learning is Intrinsic to Games

As one gamer has said, “In a game, you want to learn because you’re playing it, and if you didn’t want to learn, why would you be playing it?” (Selfe & Hawisher, 2007, p. 1). For this very reason, games are uniquely powerful tools that help teachers understand how to build empowering lessons and shape how students experience learning. Each game is a curriculum unto itself; each game is a unique engine that can reengineer learning experiences. Every game gives the player an opportu...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Games Use Constant Feedback

Moreover, games use systems of points, scores, leaderboards, achievement walls, and other clever mechanisms to reinforce how well you are playing (or not playing). Feedback should force us to face reality and redirect our efforts where they are needed. Regular, systemic feedback is a rarity in the traditional school; it is, however, de rigueur in even the most poorly designed game. It is this regular, rapid feedback that not only stimulates persistence and self-direction but also gets people ...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Classroom as Gamespace

A gamespace is a uniquely coded and constructed place where players are expected to act before being any good at what they’re doing; they’re spaces inherently founded on the notion of risk taking. The process of building a classroom that functions as a gamespace should start with the teacher being committed to democratic learning processes that place the student at the center of his or her learning and development. Likewise, it casts the teacher as the constructor or designer of the games...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Flow Promotes Learning

Experiences that are well aligned with flow are those that we have no trouble committing to for a long time. We concentrate on them for hours at a time because we’re getting rewarded for that concentration. Even more important, perhaps, is that when we’re playing games, we want to enter that deep state of concentration. Well-crafted experiences offer a deep and effortless involvement that separates the experience of play from the experience of ordinary life. These experiences are enjoyabl...
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Parental Resistance to Educational Change

The greatest challenges facing parents stem from their own school experiences. Every adult has been educated in some way, and the methods their teachers used usually shape the values they carry with them and color their perceptions of how education “should be.” These learned values are very powerful and can be seen in the ongoing controversies that manifest in social media regarding the Common Core State Standards and math instruction, for example. The notion that there is a critical-thin...
Folksonomies: education change
Folksonomies: education change
  1  notes

This explains resistance to the Common Core as well.

10 MAR 2017

 Changing Focus from Teacher to Learning in Education

Most theories of teaching and learning take a particular stance on the role of the teacher and the relative importance of the teaching act, in contrast to the role of the learner and the learning act. This fundamental division splits the world of educational theory into two clear schools of thought. In the first—more ancient—school, it is the authority of the teacher that takes pride of place. The teacher is seen as a master or wise one who possesses knowledge and who, through the act of ...
Folksonomies: education teaching
Folksonomies: education teaching
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Constructivism

Jean Piaget’s work is the origin of Constructivism, which is the foundation of learning-centered classrooms (Bogost, 2007). Constructivism is a broad theory of learning that argues (quite unlike Essentialism) that what matters in learning is not the accumulation of facts, paradigms, and theories but rather the meaning making that comes from taking these disparate notions and integrating them to form new knowledge. What matters is not the received wisdom handed down from generation to genera...
Folksonomies: education constructivism
Folksonomies: education constructivism
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Points in a Learning Game

A twist in this learning contest is how teams can earn even more natural, military, sociocultural, or national will points to spend. Imperialism is a complex topic, and each country is an entire class of learners in competition with other classes. Classes can earn additional points in these four areas by doing research. They can earn natural resource points by generating content that reveals information about the nations that were colonized. For example, a fact sheet on The Gambia might be wo...
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Gamification Auction Mechanic

On a previous assessment, Mrs. Tabor asked her students three different questions to assess their science-centered critical thinking. Based on the answers, she gives each student a chip with a different color and value (much like the suns in Ra). Students who demonstrated an “average” level of critical-thinking skills get chips worth 3 or 4; students who demonstrated greater critical-thinking skills get chips worth slightly less (2 or 3); and students who struggled a bit get chips worth m...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Gamification Card Drafting Mechanic

Mrs. Lee creates five decks of cards to structure her assessment—each deck has two cards more than the total number of students (to increase variability). The cards in Deck 1 have the name of a 20th century poet who was not the subject of an in-class discussion. The cards in Deck 2 each feature a poetic theme (e.g., love, death). The cards in Deck 3 stipulate a poetic technique (e.g., assonance, metaphor). The cards in Deck 4 feature a form of creative expression (e.g., write a song, write ...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Gamification Hand Mechanic

Mr. Hedges realizes that this technique could neatly simulate the complexity of the Iowa caucuses. He creates a deck of cards to represent Democratic and Republican candidates and all of the different kinds of factions and perspectives that might influence how voters behave in their individual caucus sites. He has one of his classes play a Democratic caucus and the other play a Republican one. The game he creates is played over three turns (coffee hour, early evening, evening). Players are as...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Gamification Memory Mechanic

In Memory games, the action of the game has some element that is dependent on players’ memory. This is simple and straightforward enough on its surface, but it becomes interestingly complex when examined in greater detail. What particular parts of memory are being tasked by the game? Some games ask the player to memorize and recall specific details or patterns. Others call on memories that a player brings into the game from his or her actual life. Still other memory games ask players not on...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Gamification Pattern Building Mechanic

Ms. Forsythe divides her class into four teams (Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome). Each team, over the course of the unit, learns about all four artistic cultures but becomes an expert in one. For a 20- to 30-minute exercise in discerning and judging the difference among these artistic cultures, Ms. Forsythe displays a piece of sculpture from each of the four cultures onto a large piece of heavy paper or cardboard and then cuts that image into smaller tiles and tosses all of the pieces to...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Gamification Pickup and Deliver Mechanic

Dr. Boxer decides to create a game board that depicts a cell and pieces for 12 different materials that might be transported into or out of the cell. Students are assigned to teams and given the opportunity to place certain materials either in the cell or in the bloodstream (which surrounds the cell and through which these materials move around the board). He then adds a small role-playing element to the game by giving each team an identity (such as a moving company) and an objective separate...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Gamification Racing/Grid Movement

Ms. Spooner, a long-time game player, realizes that the Racing/Grid Movement mechanic is the right choice for her students because it is particularly good at helping to assess highly granular pieces of content or skills. She envisions a game in which her students are divided into two- or threeperson teams. She wants these students to be able to identify and produce three different things: (1) the pitch of particular notes, (2) the sounds of distinct instruments, and (3) the work of particular...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Gamification Set Collection

I recently codeveloped a game with a colleague who teaches a course in global studies to advanced high school students. We called the game Global Shuffle, and it was meant to simulate two realities of the 21st century global marketplace. First, the developed world creates certain kinds of resources, and the developing world creates different resources. Though this is true, these resources relate to each other and have a reflexive quality; resources that are available or made in the developed ...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Gamification Simultaneous Action Selection Mechanic

Dr. Mays uses the Simultaneous Action Selection mechanic to structure his lesson. He creates two decks of cards—one with names of different cellular components (e.g., ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum) and another with a wide assortment of cellular functions and processes. He seats students in groups of five or six and explains the rules. During each turn, one student is going to pick a card from the component deck and read it out loud. Then the other students select a card from their hand (...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Gamification Stock Holding Mechanic

Mrs. Lazarus has some experience with games such as this and decides to construct a blank environment (a planet without biomes) with a 10 × 10 grid, thereby creating a board with 100 squares. Before play, each student is given three different animals or plants (one with a broad tolerance for several different habitats, one that is a bit more particular, and one that is very fussy indeed). The players then use their numbered tiles and shares to shape and manipulate this blank environment to t...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017

 Arcade Games in Game-Based Education

Arcade games such as Pac-Man, Asteroids, Tempest, Gauntlet, and the like are not useless to the gamifying teacher. Rather, their use is limited . . . and their usefulness makes them more akin to board games than contemporary video games. What is Pac-Man but a game of pattern management? Gauntlet is as much about resource management as anything else. These are notions that were discussed in the previous level. So, don’t exclude the value of the old-school video game . . . but don’t equate ...
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