Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Karaganis, Joe (2007), Structures of participation in digital culture, Social Science Research, Retrieved on 2013-06-29
  • Source Material [books.google.com]
  • Folksonomies: computers

    Memes

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    Child Reference

     The Diablo Pogrom
    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book Chapter:  Thomas, Doug (2007), The Diablo Pogrom, Strutures of Participation in Digital Culture, Retrieved on 2013-08-28
    Folksonomies: xenophobia virtual
    Child Reference Memes
    28 AUG 2013

     Nationalism in a Virtual World

    As the game grew in international popularity, players from all over the world converged on the U.S. West server, leading to frequent overloading and lag in game play. The problem became particularly acute when Diablo II was released in Korea. Within a few weeks of its release, Diablo II sold 300,000 copies, making it far and away Blizzard’s most profitable overseas launch. This rapid uptake produced a massive influx of game players into U.S. West, causing further problems with game lag. Whe...
      1  notes

    Story of when Diablo II opened in Korea and the influx of users sparked a hostile reaction from Western players.


    Child Reference

     Picturing the Public
    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book Chapter:  Sack, Warren (2007), Picturing the Public, Retrieved on 2013-08-05
    Folksonomies: sociology
    Child Reference Memes
    05 AUG 2013

     Sociological Metaphors for the Public

    Social science and philosophy have generated a vast number of other metaphorical descriptions of the public, rooted in different and often scientific perspectives on systematicity and relation. These are technologies in the broad sense that they enable different kinds of questions to be asked. An account of these would include the public as: A Physical System or Mass: This metaphor underwrites work in mass commu- nications and allows one to ask questions like “What is the impact of a given...
    Folksonomies: metaphors modeling
    Folksonomies: metaphors modeling
      1  notes

    Metaphors are an important means of understanding abstract concepts.


    Child Reference

     Notes on Contagious Media
    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book Chapter:  Peretti, Jonah (2007), Notes on Contagious Media, Retrieved on 2013-08-05
    Folksonomies: information technology culture
    Child Reference Memes
    05 AUG 2013

     The Bored at Work Network (BWN)

    Global capitalism has produced hundreds of millions of bored office workers who sit in front of computers forwarding emails and surfing the Web. These alienated white-collar professionals spend half their day sharing media with their friends, inadvertently creating the Bored at Work Network (BWN). A by-product of alienated labor, the BWN has become the largest alternative to the corporate media. Activists, artists, and hackers can reach millions of people through the BWN, successfully distri...
      1  notes

    A network where viral memes propagate.


    Child Reference

     None of This is Real: Identity and Participation in Friendster
    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book Chapter:  Boyd, Danah (2007), None of This is Real: Identity and Participation in Friendster, Retrieved on 2013-08-05
    Folksonomies: social networking social structures
    Child Reference Memes
    05 AUG 2013

     Social Networks "Flatten" Social Structures

    Visibility has its cost; in order to make broader social networks vis- ible, Friendster flattens those networks, collapsing relationship types and contexts into the ubiquitous “Friend.” More problematically, Friendster does not provide ways of mapping or interpreting the contextual cues and social structural boundaries that help people manage their social worlds. Physi- cal distance, to abstract from the obvious, is not just an obstacle to build- ing social relations but is also the dimen...
      1  notes

    They create a new form of interaction, where people do not know the rules; therefore, they resort to experimentation to learn how to interact.

    05 AUG 2013

     Social Networks Limit Interaction to "Autistic" Levels

    It is hardly surprising that many participants find social interactions on Friendster formulaic. The social structure is defined by a narrow set of rules that do little to map the complexities and nuances of relationships in other contexts. Formula-driven social worlds require everyone to engage with each other through a severely diminished mediator—what I have else- where called autistic social software, as a metaphor to signal the structured formula that autistic individuals learn to nego...
      1  notes

    Because of the limited kinds of interactions possible within a Social Network.

    05 AUG 2013

     The Fakester Genocide and Revolution

    When Friendster eliminated the “most popular” feature in May 2003, they also deleted both Burning Man and Ali G, each of whom had more than 10,000 friends. This was the start of a Whack-A-Mole–style purge of Fakesters, in which Fakesters and Friendster competed for dominance. Fakester farms were created and Fakester owners would duplicate their Fakesters for rein- sertion. In late June, a group of Fakesters gathered on the Friendster bul- letin board (and later in a Yahoo Group) to begi...
      1  notes

    An interesting and obscure bit of Social Networking history.


    Child Reference

     The Past and the Internet
    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book Chapter:  Bowker, Geoffrey C. (2007), The Past and the Internet, Retrieved on 2013-06-29
    Folksonomies: information post modernism
    Child Reference Memes
    30 JUN 2013

     The Past and Who Has Access to It

    What we know about the past—and who has access to such knowledge—has changed dramatically with each such change. The changes run far deeper than the mere proliferation of data points. As written records of large estates held in monasteries in France achieved legal and social dominance, the role of women as the tellers of the past fell into decline (Geary, 1994): The technological and the social were deeply intertwined. The outcome was that different kinds of records were kept. With the in...
    Folksonomies: history heirarchy
    Folksonomies: history heirarchy
      1  notes

    The past was once only available through memory, then only available to those who had access to records, and now available to everyone.

    30 JUN 2013

     Our Collective Memory

    Taken globally, the set of traces that we leave in the world does without doubt add up to something. It is through operations on sets of traces that I understand an event that I take part in. Tolstoy wrote about the foot soldier in the Napoleonic wars. The soldier he describes cannot have the experience of the war he is waging nor the battle he is fighting because the only “global” traces of the war are inscriptions—notably, maps and statistics. There is no scalable observation that mov...
      1  notes

    No one soldier experiences a War. They experience details from their microcosm encounter with the war. The war itself is a collective memory experienced only in history books.

    30 JUN 2013

     Digital Archiving Creates an Immense Wealth of History

    With digital archiving in all its forms, however, a new regime of technologies for holding past experience has emerged. Our past has always been malleable, but now it is malleable with a new viscosity. Whereas in the past our experiences were frequently (literally!) pigeonholed into rigid classification systems, leading to a relative paucity of tales we could tell of our past, today the traces have multiplied and the rigid classifications are withering. (Who now does a “tree” search using...
      1  notes

    We once had to document history, but now our lives are documented for us all over the place online.

    30 JUN 2013

     The Epoch of Potential Memory

    One can see Manovich’s argument becoming true in the development of database technology the 20th century. The first commercially available computer databases were organized hierarchically. If you wanted to get to a particular piece of information, you went to the overarching category and made a series of choices as this category broke down into groups then subgroups until you got to the specific piece of information that you required. This mode of traveling through a database was called “...
      1  notes

    We live in a world where we can pull any aggregation of facts out of historical references to produce the aspects of history we wish to explore. It is dynamic and full of potential.


    Child Reference

     Pirate Infrastructures
    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book Chapter:  Larkin, Brian (2007), Pirate Infrastructures, Retrieved on 2013-06-29
    Folksonomies: culture piracy
    Child Reference Memes
    29 JUN 2013

     The Gas Lamp Brought Networked Collective Life

    Wolfgang Schivelbusch (1995) argues that one of the most important transformations of networked urban life came with the rise of the gas lamp. The introduction of gas ended the autonomy of oil lamps and candles whereby each household effectively supplied its own energy needs. Gas represented the industrialization of light, transforming households into nodes of a centralized power source, linking the domestic and intimate to larger structures of capital and the state. In this way, Schivelbusch...
    Folksonomies: collectivity communalism
    Folksonomies: collectivity communalism
      1  notes

    Before people became dependent on the grid, they were independent and autonomous.

    30 JUN 2013

     Piracy Preserves Data and Media that Otherwise Wouldn't b...

    In Nigeria as elsewhere, piracy creates new kinds of archives inconceivable outside of this mode of media reproduction. In markets specializing in wholesale tape duplication, sellers have sprung up specializing in the storage and preservation of different music forms. These sellers maintain substantial archives of Indian film songs, traditional Hausa singers such as Mamman Shata and Musa ‘Dan Kwairo, and new music forms such as bandiri, a religious music that takes tunes from Hindi films an...
      1  notes

    This is true of the Pirate Bay, where it is possible to find out-of-print games, discontinued music, and old collectible books nearly impossible to get otherwise.


    Child Reference

     Technologies of the Childhood Imagination
    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book Chapter:  Ito, Mizuko (2007), Technologies of the Childhood Imagination, Retrieved on 2013-06-29
    Folksonomies: culture geek culture
    Child Reference Memes
    29 JUN 2013

     Yu-Gi-Oh! Mixes the Real with Fantasy.

    Trading cards, Game Boys, and character merchandise create what Anne Allison (2004) has called “pocket fantasies,” “digitized icons . . . that children carry with them wherever they go,” and “that straddle the border between phantasm and everyday life” (p. 42). The imagination of Yu-Gi-Oh! pervades the everyday settings of childhood as it is channeled through these portable and intimate media forms. These forms of play are one part of a broader set of shifts toward intimate and po...
      1  notes

    Similar to Magic the Gathering, with the player being the real and the cards the fantasy.

    29 JUN 2013

     The Hypersociality of Collectible Card Games

    Yu-Gi-Oh! demonstrates how pervasive media technologies in everyday settings integrate the imagination into a wider range of sites of social activity. Far from the shut-in behavior that gave rise to the most familiar forms of antimedia rhetoric, this media mix of children’s popular culture is wired, extroverted, and hypersocial, reflecting forms of sociality augmented by dense sets of technologies, signifiers, and systems of exchange. David Buckingham and Julian Sefton-Green (2004) have arg...
      1  notes

    CCGs are a very social game, involving not just game play but trading, bargaining, getting out to find cards, etc.