07 NOV 2019 by ideonexus

 "Scandals" - Animals Evolved from Cancer Cells

Panchin knows the idea of cancer-derived animals sounds far-fetched — so much so that, in the paper, he and his co-authors refer to them as Scandals (an acronym for “speciated by cancer development animals”). [...] According to Panchin’s three-step scenario, a Scandal would start off as a cancer, but not just any cancer. It would have to be transmissible, so that it wouldn’t die when its host did. Then the cancer would have to spread to other species, and then independently evolve...
Folksonomies: evolution biology cancer
Folksonomies: evolution biology cancer
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06 JAN 2018 by ideonexus

 Pattern-Seeking Through Play

Meredith's worldplay was shot through with yet another well-recognized ingigredienlent of creative thinking, the comparison and synthesis of two or more unlike things. As the mathematician and poet Jacob Bronowski famously expressed it, the discoveries of science and of art "are explorations—^more, are explosions, of a hidden likeness The same holds true for the insights generated in worldplay. Documents of play in Lewis, like many a child, combined the animal and the human in Lord Big. Una...
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12 NOV 2015 by ideonexus

 Humans as Self-Domesticating Animals

at the end of the Pleistocene, certain human groups and their animal associates began progressively to show parallel reductions in size and stature, cranial gracilization, changes in post-cranial robusticity, shortening of the face and jaws, tooth crowding and malocclusion, and tooth-size reduction and simplification. There has been no recent attempt to explain the parallelism, although numerous explanations exist for the changes as they affect one or other of the parties. Some of the explana...
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Restrictive environments, artificially constructed give us many of the traits shared with the animals we domesticate.

19 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 Make It a Treat

"Make It a Treat" is similar in spirit to "everything in moderation," but still very distinct. "Moderation" suggests a regular, low-level intake of something. MIAT asks for more austerity; it encourages you to keep the special things in life special. I apply this rule in a variety of ways. For instance, I wear makeup and high heels on special occasions. But if I dressed up all the time, it would become ordinary, and I would receive fewer compliments. If makeup and heels was my everyday look, ...
Folksonomies: humor moderation
Folksonomies: humor moderation
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31 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 The Fallacy of the Insect Age

To end on a more cheerful note, I think I have found a fallacy or two in some of the more spectacular arguments used by the Insect Age enthusiasts when they are hardest pressed. For one thing, the fact that insects as a class are 300,000,000 years old, if it is a fact, while we have been here only about 1,000,000 years, or 3,000,000 at the outside, does not prove to me that the insects are bound to win. It takes more than mere old age to get along these days. I think it quite likely that the ...
Folksonomies: humor logical fallacy
Folksonomies: humor logical fallacy
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09 AUG 2014 by ideonexus

 Knowing Your Work isn't Good Enough

Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who d...
Folksonomies: art work creativity talent
Folksonomies: art work creativity talent
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13 MAR 2014 by ideonexus

 Humans are Terrifying

More seriously, humans do have a number of advantages even among Terrestrial life. Our endurance, shock resistance, and ability to recover from injury is absurdly high compared to almost any other animal. We often use the phrase “healthy as a horse” to connote heartiness - but compared to a human, a horse is as fragile as spun glass. There’s mounting evidence that our primitive ancestors would hunt large prey simply by following it at a walking pace, without sleep or rest, until it died...
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From a forum, why humans make a great monster race for other aliens to fear. Yet to find original reference yet.

08 NOV 2013 by ideonexus

 Strength vs. Cunning vs. Skill

Here, then, Skill enters the arena with a challenge to both earlier contestants — for the prize of human control, and mastery of the social machinery; enters that contest — older than the race itself — the struggle to satisfy the primordial instincts: to Live — to Control — to Take. Strength vs. Cunning vs. Skill. Thus the contest has become a triangular fight between the Strong, the Cunning, and the Skilful; a fight in which raw brute force is a participant of rapidly diminishing ...
Folksonomies: skill knowledge society
Folksonomies: skill knowledge society
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Cunning control is the winner in the 1920s, but skill will prevail.

26 SEP 2012 by ideonexus

 The Naming of the Monkey King

The Patriarch smiled and said, "Though you have rather a base sort of body, you look like one of the rhesus monkeys that eat pine seeds, and I ought to give you a surname that fits your appearance and call you Hu ('Macaque'). The elements that make up the character Hu are 'animal,' 'old' and 'moon'. What is old is ancient, and the moon embodies the Negative principle, and what is ancient and Negative cannot be transformed. But I think I would do much better to call you Sun ('Monkey'). Apart f...
Folksonomies: chinese mythology
Folksonomies: chinese mythology
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Sun Wukong, which means 'Monkey Awakened to Emptiness'

21 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Big Whorls, Little Whorls

Big whorls have little whorls Which feed on their velocity And little whorls have lesser whorls, And so on to viscosity.
Folksonomies: poetry fractals
Folksonomies: poetry fractals
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A play on the poem about fleas and little fleas.