07 NOV 2019 by ideonexus

 "Scandals" - Animals Evolved from Cancer Cells

Panchin knows the idea of cancer-derived animals sounds far-fetched — so much so that, in the paper, he and his co-authors refer to them as Scandals (an acronym for “speciated by cancer development animals”). [...] According to Panchin’s three-step scenario, a Scandal would start off as a cancer, but not just any cancer. It would have to be transmissible, so that it wouldn’t die when its host did. Then the cancer would have to spread to other species, and then independently evolve...
Folksonomies: evolution biology cancer
Folksonomies: evolution biology cancer
  1  notes
 
19 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 Make It a Treat

"Make It a Treat" is similar in spirit to "everything in moderation," but still very distinct. "Moderation" suggests a regular, low-level intake of something. MIAT asks for more austerity; it encourages you to keep the special things in life special. I apply this rule in a variety of ways. For instance, I wear makeup and high heels on special occasions. But if I dressed up all the time, it would become ordinary, and I would receive fewer compliments. If makeup and heels was my everyday look, ...
Folksonomies: humor moderation
Folksonomies: humor moderation
  1  notes
 
31 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 The Fallacy of the Insect Age

To end on a more cheerful note, I think I have found a fallacy or two in some of the more spectacular arguments used by the Insect Age enthusiasts when they are hardest pressed. For one thing, the fact that insects as a class are 300,000,000 years old, if it is a fact, while we have been here only about 1,000,000 years, or 3,000,000 at the outside, does not prove to me that the insects are bound to win. It takes more than mere old age to get along these days. I think it quite likely that the ...
Folksonomies: humor logical fallacy
Folksonomies: humor logical fallacy
  1  notes
 
09 AUG 2014 by ideonexus

 Knowing Your Work isn't Good Enough

Nobody tells this to people who are beginners, I wish someone told me. All of us who do creative work, we get into it because we have good taste. But there is this gap. For the first couple years you make stuff, it’s just not that good. It’s trying to be good, it has potential, but it’s not. But your taste, the thing that got you into the game, is still killer. And your taste is why your work disappoints you. A lot of people never get past this phase, they quit. Most people I know who d...
Folksonomies: art work creativity talent
Folksonomies: art work creativity talent
  1  notes
 
08 NOV 2013 by ideonexus

 Strength vs. Cunning vs. Skill

Here, then, Skill enters the arena with a challenge to both earlier contestants — for the prize of human control, and mastery of the social machinery; enters that contest — older than the race itself — the struggle to satisfy the primordial instincts: to Live — to Control — to Take. Strength vs. Cunning vs. Skill. Thus the contest has become a triangular fight between the Strong, the Cunning, and the Skilful; a fight in which raw brute force is a participant of rapidly diminishing ...
Folksonomies: skill knowledge society
Folksonomies: skill knowledge society
  1  notes

Cunning control is the winner in the 1920s, but skill will prevail.

21 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Big Whorls, Little Whorls

Big whorls have little whorls Which feed on their velocity And little whorls have lesser whorls, And so on to viscosity.
Folksonomies: poetry fractals
Folksonomies: poetry fractals
  2  notes

A play on the poem about fleas and little fleas.

11 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Tiny Legs

But many of our imaginations and investigations of nature are futile, especially when we see little living animals and see their legs and must judge the same to be ten thousand times thinner than a hair of my beard, and when I see animals living that are more than a hundred times smaller and am unable to observe any legs at all, I still conclude from their structure and the movements of their bodies that they do have legs... and therefore legs in proportion to their bodies, just as is the cas...
  1  notes

Leeuwenhoek observes that there are animals that move, but are too small to see their legs, but he knows they have legs and that those legs must somehow carry nutrients within them.

07 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Type 0 and Type III Civilizations

It's humbling to realise that the developmental gulf between a miniscule ant colony and our modern human civilisation is only a tiny fraction of the distance between a Type 0 and a Type III civilisation – a factor of 100 billion billion, in fact. Yet we have such a highly regarded view of ourselves, we believe a Type III civilisation would find us irresistible and would rush to make contact with us. The truth is, however, they may be as interested in communicating with humans as we are keen...
Folksonomies: perspective
Folksonomies: perspective
  1  notes

We are closer to ants than the more advanced civilizations, so why would they show anymore interest in us than we the ants?

06 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Humanity is Like an Infant

Taking a very gloomy view of the future of the human race, let us suppose that it can only expect to survive for two thousand millions years longer, a period about equal to the past age of the earth. Then, regarded as a being destined to live for three-score years and ten, humanity although it has been born in a house seventy years old, is itself only three days old. But only in the last few minutes has it become conscious that the whole world does not centre round its cradle and its trapping...
Folksonomies: metaphor perspective
Folksonomies: metaphor perspective
  1  notes

In a house 70 years old, but it is only three days old, and starting to see the house around it.

23 APR 2012 by ideonexus

 Consciousness is the Last Mystery

Human consciousness is just about the last surviving mystery. A mystery is a phenomenon that people don't know how to think about—yet. There have been other great mysteries: the mystery of the origin of the universe, the mystery of life and reproduction, the mystery of the design to be found in nature, the mysteries of time, space, and gravity. These were not just areas of scientific ignorance, but of utter bafflement and wonder. We do not yet have the final answers to any of the questions ...
Folksonomies: science consciousness
Folksonomies: science consciousness
  1  notes

Not because we don't understand it, There are lots of things we don't understand, but because we don't even know how to think about it.