27 JUL 2018 by ideonexus

 The Universality of Play

Gutsmuths.—Many of the ideas in PHome are better expressed, though independently arrived at, in the remarkable volume on play, published by Gutsmuths, ‘the father of play in Germany,’ towards the end of the eighteenth century. Gutsmuths recognised the universality of play among all ages and all peoples, the infinite number of games and the skill exhibited by the race in their invention and manipulation, the health-giving quality of play and its ultimate origin (though fatigue and ennui ...
Folksonomies: education play
Folksonomies: education play
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22 NOV 2017 by ideonexus

 Removing Prepositions in Defining Thought

Having turned my back on propositions, I thought, what am I going to do about this? The area where it really comes up is when you start looking at the contents of consciousness, which is my number one topic. I like to quote Maynard Keynes on this. He was once asked, “Do you think in words or pictures?” to which he responded, “I think in thoughts.” It was a wonderful answer, but also wonderfully uninformative. What the hell’s a thought then? How does it carry information? Is it like ...
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16 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 Reflection is Destructive

So long as scientists and philosophers remain a caste, even the problem of morality, that is, of behaviour, will remain for them one of cognition and not of activity, a subject for study and not for practical application, something that just happens rather than something that must be done and, furthermore, done not by individuals but collectively. So long as scholars are not prepared to become a Commission for the elaboration of a plan of common action (and without this mankind cannot act a...
Folksonomies: academia cosmism
Folksonomies: academia cosmism
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22 JAN 2014 by ideonexus

 Concepts Represent the Complex of Our Experiences

The only justification for our concepts is that they serve to represent thc complex of our experiences; beyond this they have no legitimacy. I am convinced that the philosophers had a harmful effect upon the progress of scientific thinking in removing certain fundamental concepts from the domain of empiricism, where they are under control, to the intangible heights of the a priori—the universe of ideas is just as little independent of the nature of our experiences as clothes are of the form...
Folksonomies: metaphor philosophy ideas
Folksonomies: metaphor philosophy ideas
  1  notes

Just as clothes represent the form of the human body.

15 NOV 2013 by ideonexus

 Observations are Grounded in Language

What are observations? Some philosophers have taken them to be sensory events: the occurrence of smells, feels, noises, color patches. This way lies frustration. What we ordinarily notice and testify to are rather the objects and events out in the world. It is to these that our very language is geared, because language is a social institution, learned from other people who share the scene to which the words refer. Observation sentences, like theoretical sentences, are for the most part senten...
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Not senses.

21 MAY 2013 by ideonexus

 Ship of Theseus Paradox

The ship wherein Theseus and the youth of Athens returned [from Crete] had thirty oars, and was preserved by the Athenians down even to the time of Demetrius Phalereus, for they took away the old planks as they decayed, putting in new and stronger timber in their place, insomuch that this ship became a standing example among the philosophers, for the logical question of things that grow; one side holding that the ship remained the same, and the other contending that it was not the same.
Folksonomies: philosophy paradox
Folksonomies: philosophy paradox
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Is a ship that has every board and nail replaced the same ship?

19 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 Greeks and Romans Lacked the Virtue of Doubt

The Greek and Roman antiquarians, and even their literati and philosophers, are chargeable with a total neglect of that spirit of doubt which subjects to a rigorous investigation both sacts, and the proofs that establish them. In reading their accounts of the history of events or of manners, of the productions and phenomena of nature, or of the works and processes of the arts, we are astonished at the composure with which they relate the most palpable absurdities, and the most fulsome and dis...
Folksonomies: history doubt
Folksonomies: history doubt
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...and as a result, their writing reveals an incredible gullibility.

19 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 The Death of Socrates

The burning of the Pythagorean school had already signalized the war, not less ancient, not less eager, of the oppressors of mankind against philosophy. The one and the other will continue to be waged as long as there shall exist priests or kings upon the earth; and these wars will occupy a conspicuous place in the picture that we have still to delineate. Priests saw with grief the appearance of men, who, cultivating the powers of reason, ascending to first principles, could not but discover...
Folksonomies: history philosophy
Folksonomies: history philosophy
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Retaliation from the priesthood.

09 JAN 2013 by ideonexus

 Science Faith

Many religious believers mischaracterize naturalists as people without faith, but that is absurd. Eve^ryone must believe in something—it's part of human nature. I I have no problem acknowledging that 1 have beliefs, though they differ from more traditional kinds of faith. Naturalists must believe, first of all, that the work is understandable and that it knowledge of the world can be obtained through observation, experimentation, and verification. Most scientists don't think much about this...
Folksonomies: science faith naturalism
Folksonomies: science faith naturalism
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Scientists have faith that the world can be understood rationally.

12 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Variety of Temperaments in Scientists

Scientists are people of very dissimilar temperaments doing different things in very different ways. Among scientists are collectors, classifiers and compulsive tidiers-up; many are detectives by temperament and many are explorers; some are artists and others artisans. There are poets–scientists and philosopher–scientists and even a few mystics. ... and most people who are in fact scientists could easily have been something else instead.
Folksonomies: science culture
Folksonomies: science culture
  1  notes

Collectors, philosophers, explorers, mystics...