30 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Three Types of Faith

philosopher Paul Kurtz, in his book The Transcendental Temptation, defines three distinctly different kinds of faith, derived from the amount (or total lack) of evidence drawn upon to support it. Kurtz defines the first kind as “intransigent faith.” By this is meant faith that will not be affected by any sort of contrary evidence, no matter how strong. My own experience with some few persons who persist in believing in certain paranormal claims that have been conclusively proven false ena...
Folksonomies: faith empricism belief
Folksonomies: faith empricism belief
  1  notes

Type I is belief in what is proven false, type II is belief in what has no evidence, and type III is empirical scientifically-proven belief.

29 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Reality Teaches Us

At birth one may stand at the cross-roads for only a few lal. The adjustments are peremptory. The human mechanism must adjust itself to the new world. If it does,—then life. Sometimes it is necessary to "slap" it. That is "science" giving a first lesson in adjustment. An adequate supply of oxygen for the cells of the body is the first problem man faces when he comes into this world. Every pink pill is not a piece of candy. Science goes to the rescue and re-establishes adjustments. Man tires...
  1  notes

We start out trying to figure out the world, and science teaches us the lessons, but when we overbelieve--go beyond empirical evidence--we "may spoil the garden."

29 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Overbeliefs

The "overbeliefs" of an enlightened man rest on the firmest basis of reality available. This he finds in the scientific picture of the universe of his age. On this foundation of natural knowledge he erects a unique unproven structure of "overbeliefs" concerning his universe, origin, life, hereafter, religion and God. "A man's religion must not give the lie to the world in which he lives. It must be as intelligent as Man". If the overbeliefs of an individual cannot be proven inconsistent with ...
  1  notes

Human beings see the world through our desires and build a universe to fit with what we want from it.

29 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Man, Universe-Builder and Maker of Over-Beliefs

Every man is a "Universe-Builder"; he is, likewise, a maker of "Over-beliefs". Man's inner and outer necessities, real or imagined, have made him both a Scientist and a Philosopher. Neither Science nor Philosophy alone has been adequate. The material facts of the science of his universe have not satisfied; an "overbelief" or a "philosophy" in terms of which an interpretation of his life as a whole may be attempted has been a necessity. He has been in search not only of facts but of meaning ...
  1  notes

Introduction to a 1930's science book. The language is very interesting. The passage is very insightful in places, naive in others, but poetic throughout.

15 NOV 2013 by ideonexus

 Beliefs are Like the Charge in a Battery

Inculcating a belief is like charging a battery. The battery is thenceforward disposed to give a spark or shock, when suitably approached, as long as the charge lasts; similarly the believer is disposed to respond in characteristic ways, when suitably approached, as long as the belief lasts. The belief, like the charge, may last long or briefly. Some beliefs, like the one about Hannibal, we shall probably retain while we live. Some, like our belief in the dependability of our neighborhood cob...
Folksonomies: belief reinforcement
Folksonomies: belief reinforcement
  1  notes

Some reinforce with use (charging), while others vanish from the mind because they do not recharge.

24 OCT 2013 by ideonexus

 Better to Believe and Be Wrong Than Not Believe Anything

He who says “Better to go without belief forever than believe a lie!” merely shows his own preponderant private horror of becoming a dupe. . . . It is like a general informing his soldiers that it is better to keep out of battle forever than to risk a single wound. Not so are victories either over enemies or over nature gained. Our errors are surely not such awfully solemn things. In a world where we are so certain to incur them in spite of all our caution, a certain lightness of heart se...
Folksonomies: debate belief
Folksonomies: debate belief
  1  notes

If you believe a thing and are wrong, you can improve your beliefs in light of new evidence.

28 MAR 2012 by ideonexus

 The Virtue of Openness

Openness has several facets, but all are rooted in the same two principles: embracing your own fallibility and embracing diversity. Secularists, being human, are as prone as anyone to cling stubbornly to our opinions once they’re established. Openness includes recognizing our own fallibility: No matter how thoroughly we have examined a question, we could still be wrong. The best way to avoid being wrong is to keep our opinions and ideas open to challenge and potential disconfirmation. The...
Folksonomies: atheism virtue belief
Folksonomies: atheism virtue belief
  1  notes

The best way to avoid being wrong is to be open to ideas that challenge us.

08 JUL 2011 by ideonexus

 Teaching Babies Science

But we also have some more direct evidence for the idea that children learn like scientists. Alison and Virginia Slaughter, one of her students, looked at three-year-old children who didn't yet fully understand belief—children who still said they had always thought that there were pencils in the candy box. Then, over the course of a few weeks, Virginia gave the children systematic evidence that their predictions were false. She told them firmly that they hadn't said pencils at all, they had...
  1  notes

Having children predict something and then systematically demonstrating how their prediction is false makes them more capable of understanding how beliefs work.