09 NOV 2019 by ideonexus

 A Quantum Game

Bell came up with “nonlocal” games, which require players to be at a distance from each other with no way to communicate. Each player answers a question. The players win or lose based on the compatibility of their answers. One such game is the magic square game. There are two players, Alice and Bob, each with a 3-by-3 grid. A referee tells Alice to fill out one particular row in the grid — say the second row — by putting either a 1 or a 0 in each box, such that the sum of the number...
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04 NOV 2018 by ideonexus

 The Pleasure of Entrainment

If entrainment is a form of pleasure, it is a pleasure at once structural and experiential, both mathematically regular and playfully flexible. Entrainment is not a phenomenon completely unique to games, but it does come very close to identifying the curious structural pleasure that all game experiences seem to contain: the meditative patterns of Tetris; the turn-taking, clacking cadence of Billiards; the rhythmic shooting pattern of Space Invaders; the pulsing flow of cards, hits, and chips ...
Folksonomies: entrainment
Folksonomies: entrainment
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04 NOV 2018 by ideonexus

 Types of Information in Games

In The Interactive Book, designer and scholar Celia Pearce presents a different typology for understanding the ways games manifest information. She proposes four scenarios: · Information known to all players: In Chess, this would consist of the rules of the game, board layout, and piece movement parameters. · Information known to only one player: In Gin, this would be the cards in your hand. · Information known to the game only: In Gin, this would be unused cards in deck. In Space Invad...
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27 JUL 2018 by ideonexus

 Rules are the Persistent Identity of a Game Across Cultur...

There are at least two senses in which the RULES schemas offer a "formal" way of looking at games. First, the term formal is used in the sense of "form": rules constitute the inner form or organization of games. In other words, rules are the inner, essential structures that constitute the real-world objects known as games. For example, consider two games of Go that differ in a variety of ways. They might differ in terms of: Material: one version is played with stones on a wooden board; the o...
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16 APR 2018 by ideonexus

 Facebook is a Game

Game designer Robin Hunicke has noted that Facebook is actually a complex, massively multiplayer online game, with challenges, rewards, and levels just like any other. Think about it for a second and you'll realize that the rules are simple: be the most fun, intelligent, witty, caring version of yourself. The benefits are obvious, Hunicke observed: Facebook "makes people feel like they matter, like they have friends and family across all kinds of distances," she said. "How many games make you...
Folksonomies: social media gamification
Folksonomies: social media gamification
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Learning is Intrinsic to Games

As one gamer has said, “In a game, you want to learn because you’re playing it, and if you didn’t want to learn, why would you be playing it?” (Selfe & Hawisher, 2007, p. 1). For this very reason, games are uniquely powerful tools that help teachers understand how to build empowering lessons and shape how students experience learning. Each game is a curriculum unto itself; each game is a unique engine that can reengineer learning experiences. Every game gives the player an opportu...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Four Game Mechanics

Agon: This ancient Greek word—meaning “struggle” or “contest”— defines those games in which some aspect of a player’s or team’s skill is measured against another player or team. Any game that is based on skill and eliminates luck is a game of agon. The best examples of this type of game are athletic games such as wrestling and baseball. The games of chess and checkers are also classic examples of agon. Contemporary abstract strategy games, such as those in the Project GIPF ser...
Folksonomies: games gaming mechanics
Folksonomies: games gaming mechanics
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Six Fundamental Properties of Games

All games are in some way a combination of the four “mother” mechanics: agon, alea, mimicry, and ilinx. Games have strict rules that all players must follow. Game-winning conditions are clearly defined. There are many different ways a game can end—not just one. In other words, there’s a way to win and (usually) lots of ways to lose. Players try hard to win because winning is desirable. Games can be played repeatedly with different outcomes.
Folksonomies: gaming
Folksonomies: gaming
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 What We Learn from Games

What also went unremarked was how much I was learning by playing these games: basic ideas such as taking turns and developing patience while others completed their turns, the strengthening of simple memory, improved physical coordination, an ability to recognize and act on patterns, the capacity to see what might happen in a few turns if I took one move as opposed to another, resilience when losing, and the kind of strategic thinking that emerges once you realize that Scrabble is both a game ...
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 "This Is Not a..." Game

A game called “Th is Is Not a...” encourages multiple solutions and is played in a relaxed environment that encourages creativity. Students pass around an object—such as a toy telephone—and say, “This is not a....” Younger students name an object that is not a toy telephone (for example, “This is not a pencil.”). Older students continue and say, “This is not a toy telephone, it is a...,” and they gesture or mime to suggest the object that they are pretending the toy teleph...
Folksonomies: education games
Folksonomies: education games
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