Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Mooney, Chris and Kirshenbaum , Sheril (2009-07-13), Unscientific America: How Scientific Illiteracy Threatens our Future, Basic Books, Retrieved on 2011-05-28
Folksonomies: politics science skepticism ignorance

Memes

28 MAY 2011

 Decline of Science in Media

A 2008 analysis by the Project for Excellence in Journalism found that if you tune for five hours' worth of cable news you will probably catch only one minute's coverage of science and technology—compared with ten minutes of "celebrity and entertainment," twelve minutes of "accidents and disasters," and "26 minutes or crime." As for newspapers, from 1989 to 2005 the number featuring weekly science or science-related sections shrank by nearly two-thirds, from ninety-five to thirty-four. Thes...
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Newspapers killing their science sections and television showing less and less science content.

28 MAY 2011

 Science is Self-Isolating

Still, it is undeniable that the troubling disconnect between the i scientific community and society stems partly from the nature of scientific training today, and from scientific culture generally. ). some ways science has become self-isolating. The habits of specialization that have ensured so many research successes have also made it harder to connect outside the laboratory and the ivory tower. As a result, the scientific community simultaneously generates ever more valuable knowledge and ...
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The nature of science is quiet isolation; therefore, its memes are less capable of venturing into other minds.

28 MAY 2011

 80 Percent of Americans Can't Read the NYT Science Section

One prominent researcher on the public understanding of science has even found that due to their failure to understand basic scientific terms or the nature of the scientific process, 80 percent of Americans can't read the New York Times science section.
  1  notes

Due to scientific ignorance.

28 MAY 2011

 European Union Citizens are More Scientifically-Ignorant

To begin with, citizens of other nations don't fare much better on scientific literacy surveys, and in many cases fan worse. Residents of the European Union, for instance, are less scientifically literate overall than Americans, at least according to one metric for measuring "civic science literacy" across countries.
Folksonomies: science culture ignorance
Folksonomies: science culture ignorance
  1  notes

A surprising finding.

28 MAY 2011

 Science Bloggers Blast Science Reporting Without Expandin...

...the typical blog mode is to find an individual piece of science reporting with some particular failing and blast it—without addressing or even raising the broader issue of what's really going on in the media industry. One science logger. University of Toronto biochemist Larry Moran, even put it this way in a discussion of the widespread job losses facing science reporters: "Science journalists h have let us down. I say good riddance."
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Science bloggers helped destroy science journalism

28 MAY 2011

 Hollywood's Anti Science

"REALITY ENDS HERE." IT'S THE UNOFFICIAL MOTTO OF THE UNIVERSITY OF Southern California School of Cinematic Arts, cast in concrete at the entranceway to the Robert Zemeckis Center for Digital Arts and, in Latin, at the South entryway of a new complex building. As scientist-turned-filmmaker and use film school graduate s Randy Olson explained to us, the slogan: is not a joke. It's a bold, challenging statement—r-a basic "screw you" to the outside world who thinks that accuracy and reality ...
Folksonomies: science entertainment
Folksonomies: science entertainment
 1  1  notes

A saying found at the entrance to a film school puts down science.

28 MAY 2011

 Scientifically Accurate Movies and Profits

Contact didn't do badly. It earned $171 million worldwide, nearly doubling the ^90-million production budget. But it was also competing with two o considerably more brainless alien-related sci-fi movies, 1997's Men h in Black and 1996's Independence Day, both of which made a great at deal more money ($589 million and $817 million, respectively). And that unfavorable U financial comparison, more than 1 anything else, dramatizes the incredible challenge science faces in Hollywood. If films that...
Folksonomies: science fiction film
Folksonomies: science fiction film
  1  notes

Contact didn't do well compared to other, less-scientific films of the summer, but Dante's Peak did better than Volcano.

28 MAY 2011

 Many Great Scientific Minds Were Religious

A great many leading lights of the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment-Nicolaus Copernicus, Francis Bacon, Rene Descartes, Johannes Kepler, Galileo Galilei, Isaac Newton, Robert Boyle—were distinctly religious and viewed science as a better means of understanding God's creation and the laws governing it.
Folksonomies: science religion
Folksonomies: science religion
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And saw science as a better way to understand the creation.

28 MAY 2011

 Darwin Didn't Sound Like a Scientist

"At least at the outset," wrote the journalist Malcolm Jones, Darwin "was hardly even a scientist in the sense that we understand the term—a highly trained specialist whose professional vocabulary is so arcane that he or she can talk only to other scientists.
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His terminology was down to earth, not complex.

28 MAY 2011

 Carl Sagan Punished for Popularizing Science

Yet instead, Sagan was punished by the scientific community for his public endeavors. The persecution began as early as the 1960s, when Harvard University denied him tenure. Nobel laureate Harold Urey, a chemist who had previously served as one of Sagan's mentors, helped quash his chances with a nasty letter objecting to Sagan's budding media and outreach efforts.
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His outreach efforts were used against Sagan's pursuit of tenure at Harvard.