Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  McGonigal, Jane (2011-01-20), Reality Is Broken, Penguin, Retrieved on 2014-06-21
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  • Folksonomies: psychology

    Memes

    21 JUN 2014

     There is a mass exodus into the virtual world

    The real world just doesn’t offer up as easily the carefully designed pleasures, the thrilling challenges, and the powerful social bonding afforded by virtual environments. Reality doesn’t motivate us as effectively. Reality isn’t engineered to maximize our potential. Reality wasn’t designed from the bottom up to make us happy. And so, there is a growing perception in the gaming community: Reality, compared to games, is broken. In fact, it is more than a perception. It’s a phenom...
    Folksonomies: education gamification
    Folksonomies: education gamification
      1  notes
     
    21 JUN 2014

     Characteristics of a Game

    When you strip away the genre differences and the technological complexities, all games share four defining traits: a goal, rules, a feedback system, and voluntary participation. The goal is the specific outcome that players will work to achieve. It focuses their attention and continually orients their participation throughout the game. The goal provides players with a sense of purpose. The rules place limitations on how players can achieve the goal. By removing or limiting the obvious ways...
    Folksonomies: gamification
    Folksonomies: gamification
      1  notes
     
    21 JUN 2014

     Unnecessary Obstacles Make Games

    As a golfer, you have a clear goal: to get a ball in a series of very small holes, with fewer tries than anyone else. If you weren’t playing a game, you’d achieve this goal the most efficient way possible: you’d walk right up to each hole and drop the ball in with your hand. What makes golf a game is that you willingly agree to stand really far away from each hole and swing at the ball with a club. Golf is engaging exactly because you, along with all the other players, have agreed to ma...
    Folksonomies: gamification
    Folksonomies: gamification
      1  notes
     
    21 JUN 2014

     A good game keeps you at the edge of your ability

    As you successfully lock in Tetris puzzle pieces, you get three kinds of feedback: visual—you can see row after row of pieces disappearing with a satisfying poof; quantitative—a prominently displayed score constantly ticks upward; and qualitative—you experience a steady increase in how challenging the game feels. This variety and intensity of feedback is the most important difference between digital and nondigital games. In computer and video games, the interactive loop is satisfyingly...
    Folksonomies: gamification
    Folksonomies: gamification
      1  notes
     
    21 JUN 2014

     A good game teaches you how to play it

    What you eventually discover as you continue to play is that Portal is a game about escaping from rooms that operate according to rules you are unaware of. You learn that each room is a puzzle, increasingly booby-trapped, and the game requires you to understand more and more complex physics in order to get out. If you don’t teach yourself the physics of each new room— that is, if you don’t learn the rules of the game—you’ll be stuck there forever, listening to the AI system repeat h...
    Folksonomies: gamification
    Folksonomies: gamification
      1  notes
     
    21 JUN 2014

     Why hard work others ask us to do doesn't inspire us

    In our real lives, hard work is too often something we do because we have to do it—to make a living, to get ahead, to meet someone else’s expectations, or simply because someone else gave us a job to do. We resent that kind of work. It stresses us out. It takes time away from our friends and family. It comes with too much criticism. We’re afraid of failing. We often don’t get to see the direct impact of our efforts, so we rarely feel satisfied. Or, worse, our real-world work isn’t ...
    Folksonomies: gamification
    Folksonomies: gamification
      1  notes
     
    21 JUN 2014

     Entertaining Work is a Moral Issue

    I’m not the first person to notice that reality is broken compared with games, especially when it comes to giving us good, hard work. In fact, the science of happiness was first born thirty-five years ago, when an American psychologist by the name of Mihály Csíkszentmihályi observed the very same thing. In 1975, Csíkszentmihályi published a groundbreaking scientific study called Beyond Boredom and Anxiety. The focus of the study was a specific kind of happiness that Csíkszentmihályi ...
    Folksonomies: gamification
    Folksonomies: gamification
      1  notes

    Isn't this also a matter of perspective? Don't we need to look at life like a game?

    The problem is that real-life isn't like a game. A really tough programming problem doesn't match my skills, they can go far beyond them.

    Education is ENGINEERED, so it can be like a game.

    21 JUN 2014

     External VS Internal Hapiness

    Many different competing theories of happiness have emerged from the field of positive psychology, but if there’s one thing virtually all positive psychologists agree on, it’s this: there are many ways to be happy, but we cannot find happiness. No object, no event, no outcome or life circumstance can deliver real happiness to us. We have to make our own happiness—by working hard at activities that provide their own reward.15 When we try to find happiness outside of ourselves, we’re f...
    Folksonomies: happiness gamification
    Folksonomies: happiness gamification
      1  notes

    Make your own happiness. Auto-telik

    21 JUN 2014

     Four kinds of intrinsic rewards

    First and foremost, we crave satisfying work, every single day. The exact nature of this “satisfying work” is different from person to person, but for everyone it means being immersed in clearly defined, demanding activities that allow us to see the direct impact of our efforts. Second, we crave the experience, or at least the hope, of being successful. We want to feel powerful in our own lives and show off to others what we’re good at. We want to be optimistic about our own chances fo...
    Folksonomies: happiness
    Folksonomies: happiness
      1  notes
     
    21 JUN 2014

     Satisfying Work Requires Clear, Actionable Goals

    Satisfying work always starts with two things: a clear goal and actionable next steps toward achieving that goal. Having a clear goal motivates us to act: we know what we’re supposed to do. And actionable next steps ensure that we can make progress toward the goal immediately. What if we have a clear goal, but we aren’t sure how to go about achieving it? Then it’s not work—it’s a problem. Now, there’s nothing wrong with having interesting problems to solve; it can be quite engagi...
    Folksonomies: gamification
    Folksonomies: gamification
      1  notes