29 JAN 2021 by ideonexus

 Web Browsers Shouldn't Have Features

Kay: Go to a blog, go to any Wiki, and find one that's WYSIWYG like Microsoft Word is. Word was done in 1984. HyperCard was 1989. Find me Web pages that are even as good as HyperCard. The Web was done after that, but it was done by people who had no imagination. They were just trying to satisfy an immediate need. There's nothing wrong with that, except that when you have something like the Industrial Revolution squared, you wind up setting de facto standards — in this case, really bad de fa...
Folksonomies: computing
Folksonomies: computing
  1  notes

Features should come from the objects they invoke from web sites.

28 JAN 2021 by ideonexus

 Computing is Pop Culture without History

Binstock: You seem fastidious about always giving people credit for their work. Kay: Well, I'm an old-fashioned guy. And I also happen to believe in history. The lack of interest, the disdain for history is what makes computing not-quite-a-field. Binstock: You once referred to computing as pop culture. Kay: It is. Complete pop culture. I'm not against pop culture. Developed music, for instance, needs a pop culture. There's a tendency to over-develop. Brahms and Dvorak needed gypsy music ba...
  1  notes
 
21 JUN 2013 by ideonexus

 The von Neumann Model for Computing Machines

At the highest level, the major hardware components of most boards can be classifi ed into fi ve major categories: Central processing unit (CPU). The master processor. Memory. Where the system’s software is stored. Input device(s). Input slave processors and relative electrical components. Output device(s). Output slave processors and relative electrical components. Data pathway(s)/bus(es). Interconnects the other components, providing a “highway” for data to travel on from one compone...
  1  notes

Based on his work explaining how electronic components could be use to perform boolean operations.

03 JAN 2011 by ideonexus

 Dimensions of an Atomic Size Computer

If we somehow manage to make an atomic size computer, it would mean that the dimension, the linear dimension, is a thousand to ten thousand times smaller than those very tiny chips that we have now. It means that the volume of the computer is 100 billionth or 10^-11 of the present volume, because the volume of the "transistor" is smaller by a factor of 10^-11 than the transistors we make today. The energy requirements for a single switch is also about eleven orders of magnitude smaller than t...
Folksonomies: computing
Folksonomies: computing
  1  notes

As described by Richard Feynman in 1985, with the benefits in energy consumption and processing power that come with it.

03 JAN 2011 by ideonexus

 A Reversible NAND Gate

The great discovery of Bennett and, independently, of Fredkin is that it is possible to do computation with a different kind of fundamental gate unit, namely, a reversible gate unit. I have illustrated their idea--with a unit which I could call a reversible NAND gate. It has thre inputs and thre outputs. Of the outputs, tow, A' and B', are the same as two of the inputs, A and B, but the third input works this way. C' is the same as C unless A and B are both 1, in which case it changes whateve...
Folksonomies: computing
Folksonomies: computing
  1  notes

Feynman describes a reversible logic gate, with three inputs and three outputs, one of which tracks the change in input and output, allowing the computer to reverse its operation and potentially pursue a different route.

03 JAN 2011 by ideonexus

 The Chance of Error in Atomic Sized Computers

The first thing that you would worry about when things get very small is Brownian motion--everything is shaking about and nothing stays in place. How can you control the circuits then? Furthermore, if a circuit does work, doesn't it now have a chance of accidentally jumping back? If we use two volts for the energy of this electric system, which is what we ordinarily use, that is eighty times the thermal energy at room temperature (kT=1/40 volt) and the chance that something jumps backward aga...
Folksonomies: computing physics
Folksonomies: computing physics
  1  notes

As things get very small we have to worry about brownian motion and quantum effects on the system.

03 JAN 2011 by ideonexus

 Number of Bits for a Set of Encyclopedias are Minuscule C...

I have estimaged how many letters there are in a the Enclyclopaedia, and I have assumed that each of my 24 million books is as big as an Encyclopaedia volume, and have calculated, then, how many bits of information there are (10^15). For each bit I allow 100 atoms. And it turns out that all of the information that man has carefully accumulated in all the books in the world can be written in this form in a cube of material one two-hundredths of an inch wide--which is the barest piece of dust t...
  1  notes

Feynman estimates the number of atoms neccessary for storing a set of encyclopedias, and then compares that to the amount of data included in a DNA string.