13 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 Phonetic Spelling Saves Time and Effort Through Fewer Let...

Simplified spelling means shorter spelling. Of the 32 Rules printed in Part 3 of this Handbook, 27 drop letters from words as now speld; 3 involv trans- positions of letters to reconcile conflicting analogies; and 2 involv substitutions of one letter for another, with the same object. In no instance has the Board recommended a change involving the addition of a let- ter to a word. Further simplifications wil result in fur- ther abbreviations. A completely fonetic sistem of notation, ...
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13 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 Simplified Spelling is Good for Americanization of the World

Foreners, when brought into personal association with those who speak English, easily learn to speak English themselvs. Its grammar is simple. It has great flexibility, due to its richness in terminology and its abundance of sinonims. It has an unsurpast litera- ture, making a knowledge of it desirable by those who hav no call to speak it. In every respect, except one, it is best fitted to be the language of sience, commerce, and international communication. The desirability of havi...
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12 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 The Many Ways of Representing Sounds in English Spelling

English spelling, owing to the conditions that gov- ernd the growth of the English language, now presents many anomalies. The same letter, or combination of letters, often represents many different sounds; while the same sound is often represented by many different letters, or combinations of letters. The combination ough, for example, represents at least 9 different sounds in the words cough, rough, though, through, plough, hough, thorough, thought, hiccough; and the sound of e in ...
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12 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 English Spelling Risks Becoming Like Chinese Ideograms

Indeed, the present tendency in the scools is to dis- regard the fonetic basis of English spelling, and to treat the written and printed words as ideografs like Chinese the pupils being taught to recognize a word by its appearance as a whole, rather than by a f util attempt to analize the supposed sounds of the letters composing it. Vast amounts of mony and incalculable years hav been spent in efforts, never wholly success- ful, to teach children to memorize the intricate and unreaso...
Folksonomies: culture spelling
Folksonomies: culture spelling
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12 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 The Printing Press and Dictionaries Crystallized Spelling

English spelling was at first practically fonetic, like the spelling of Latin, Spanish, Italian, Polish, and most other languages, and changed as pronunciation changed. In its case, however, various causes com- bined to interfere with this orderly process. Among them wer the variations in the early dialects, the dif- ferent spelling sistems of the Norman conquerors, the later different spelling sistem of the imported Dutch printers, the bungling attempts during the Renaissance to mak...
Folksonomies: spelling history
Folksonomies: spelling history
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23 AUG 2012 by ideonexus

 A Plan for the Improvement of English Spelling

For example, in Year 1 that useless letter c would be dropped to be replased either by k or s, and likewise x would no longer be part of the alphabet. The only kase in which c would be retained would be the ch formation, which will be dealt with later. Year 2 might reform w spelling, so that which and one would take the same konsonant, wile Year 3 might well abolish y replasing it with i and Iear 4 might fiks the g/j anomali wonse and for all. Jenerally, then, the improvement would kontinue...
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Mark Twain's clever observation of how to simplify English spelling.

22 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Etymology of Chemistry Terms

Each of us has read somewhere that in New Guinea pidgin the word for 'piano' is (I use English spelling) 'this fellow you hit teeth belonging to him he squeal all same pig'. I am inclined to doubt whether this expression is authentic; it looks just like the kind of thing a visitor to the Islands would facetiously invent. But I accept 'cut grass belong head belong me' for 'haircut' as genuine... Such phrases seem very funny to us, and make us feel very superior to the ignorant foreigners who u...
Folksonomies: chemistry etymology english
Folksonomies: chemistry etymology english
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Compared to the etymology of "backwards" rural terms.

28 AUG 2011 by ideonexus

 Common Spelling/Grammar Mistakes

To lay is to place something or put something down, and it must be followed by a noun or pronoun, a thing; to lie is to recline. A lie is an untruth, and to lie also means "to tell an untruth." Examples: Lay that package on the mantel, will you please? Bridgette would like to lie in the hammock near the pool. Sometimes it's tempting to lie when you're in trouble, but a lie only makes things worse. (Hint:Lay sounds like place; lie sounds like recline. But be careful: lay ...
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These examples are not on pedantic, but further demonstrate the nonsensical nature of English spelling, so convoluted as to turn people away from the lexicon.

30 NOV -0001 by ideonexus

 13 Percent of the English Language is Not Spelled Phoneti...

I received a letter today from the "Reading Reform Foundation," which tells me that "23 million (American) adults are functionally illiterate, unable to read an advertisement, a job application, directions on a medicine bottle." They say "30 percent of all schoolchildren have serious reading difficulties." I rather believe this, judging from my own limited experience with people. But why is this? Can it be that part of the reason is the matter of English spelling? The letter tells me that "87...
Folksonomies: phonetics
Folksonomies: phonetics
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If 87 percent of English words are spelled phonetically, then that means more than one in 10 is not, further explaining high levels of illiteracy in our culture.
30 NOV -0001 by ideonexus

 How a Lack of Vocabulary Can Turn a Child Off to a Subject

Consider the case of a child I observed through his eighth and ninth years. Jim was a highly verbal and mathophobic child from a professional family. His love for words and for talking showed itself very early, long before he went to school. The mathophobia developed at school. My theory is that it came as a direct result of his verbal precocity. I learned from his parents that Jim had developed an early habit of describing in words, often aloud, whatever he was doing as he did it. This habit...
Folksonomies: phonetics
Folksonomies: phonetics
  1  notes
Case study of a child strong in verbal skills, but mathphobic because the skills did not translate, despite the fact that they should have. Math-proficient children can be turned off by the illogic of English.