20 NOV 2018 by ideonexus

 Seeing Organizations as Biological Systems

There’s a continuing struggle between complexity and robustness in both evolution and human design. A kind of survival imperative, whether in biology, engineering, or business requires that simple, fragile systems become more robust. But the mechanisms to increase robustness will in turn make the system considerably more complex. Furthermore, that additional complexity brings with it its own unanticipated failure modes, which are corrected over time with additional robust mechanisms, which ...
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- Other takeaways: Resilience, rather than efficiency. Holism, rather than reductionism. Plurality, rather than universality. Pragmatism, rather than intellectualism Experimentation, rather than deduction Indirect, rather than direct approaches

04 NOV 2018 by ideonexus

 Complexity in Systems

On the far left are fixed systems that remain unchanging.hand, a screen that is full of random static would be completely The relationships between their elements are always the chaotic, with the color of a dot at one moment having nothing same. The black, unchanging TV screen is a good image for this kind of system. To the right of fixed systems in the chart are periodic ones. Periodic systems are simple systems that repeat the same patterns endlessly. The simple two-building version of the...
Folksonomies: games complexity gaming
Folksonomies: games complexity gaming
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11 JUL 2017 by ideonexus

 Recursive Cybernetic Design

In 1962, a few years before Alan Kay started his career, Engelbart set the program for his own U.S. Air Force–funded research group at the Stanford Research Institute (Bardini 2000:1-32), aiming for nothing less than to re-engineer the “HLAM-T,” the “Human using Language, Artifacts, Methodology, in which he is Trained” (Engelbart 1962:9). This HLAM-T was always a cyborg, and as such it can be engaged in a continuous process of “augmenting human intellect.” According to Engelbart...
Folksonomies: iterative cybernetics
Folksonomies: iterative cybernetics
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16 JUL 2013 by ideonexus

 Systems Science as a Subset of Other Sciences

Systems science is best seen as a science that consists of nested sub-sciences. It is presented most compactly using the notation of set theory. Let A represent a science of description. Let B represent a science of design. Let C represent a science of complexity. Let D represent a science of action (praxiology). Let E represent systems science. Then A ⊂ B ⊂ C ⊂ D ⊂ E illustrates the concept that we can learn something of systems science by first learning a science of description. ...
Folksonomies: science systems science
Folksonomies: science systems science
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Using set notation... an interesting way to describe the field.

30 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 Homeostasis

The constant conditions which are maintained in the body might be termed equilibria. That word, however, has come to have fairly exact meaning as applied to relatively simple physico-chemical states, in closed systems, where known forces are balanced. The coordinated physiological processes which maintain most of the steady states in the organism are so complex and so peculiar to living beings- involving, as they may, the brain and nerves, the heart, lungs, kidneys and spleen, all working coo...
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Origin of the word, meaning the tendency of animal life to maintain an internal equilibrium.

01 JAN 2010 by ideonexus

 Cybernetics Extending Human Perception

And man's relationship to his environment has changed. As a result of cybernetic efficiency, he finds himself becoming more and more predominantly a Controller and less and Effecter. The machine, largely self-regulating and highly adaptive, stands between man and his world. It extends his perception in furthest space and deep into the finest particles of matter; physical labour is replaced by accurate, tireless automata; in many situations teh machine can gather required information, store, p...
Folksonomies: new media
Folksonomies: new media
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This passage appears under a sub-section titled "Science and a Discipline for Art", where the author is arguing for artists to pay attention to progress being made in science for inspirations to enhance their artistic endeavors.