19 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 People With High Cognition Want More

First, it seems to me (based on anecdotal evidence and personal observations) that people who are already endowed with above-average cognitive capacities are at least as eager, and, from what I can tell, actually more eager, to obtain further improvements in these capacities than are people who are less talented in these regards. For instance, someone who is musically gifted is likely to spend more time and effort trying to further develop her musical capacities than is somebody who lacks a m...
Folksonomies: cognition transhumanism
Folksonomies: cognition transhumanism
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From Nick Bostrom's "Why I Want to be a Posthuman When I Grow Up"

04 SEP 2014 by ideonexus

 tDCS Works Better Than Caffeine

So, using tDCS, McKinley’s lab kept 30 people up for 30 hours to see how they fared with and without fatigue interventions. Essentially, they compared the effects of 200 mg of caffeine (about equal to 2 cups of coffee) to 30 minutes of tDCS at two milliamps (mA) applied to an area of the brain called the dorsolateral pre-frontal cortex, which is very important for the cognitive processes of attention and vigilance. The results suggest that applying electricity to a brain for half an hour is...
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30 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Three Types of Faith

philosopher Paul Kurtz, in his book The Transcendental Temptation, defines three distinctly different kinds of faith, derived from the amount (or total lack) of evidence drawn upon to support it. Kurtz defines the first kind as “intransigent faith.” By this is meant faith that will not be affected by any sort of contrary evidence, no matter how strong. My own experience with some few persons who persist in believing in certain paranormal claims that have been conclusively proven false ena...
Folksonomies: faith empricism belief
Folksonomies: faith empricism belief
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Type I is belief in what is proven false, type II is belief in what has no evidence, and type III is empirical scientifically-proven belief.

21 OCT 2013 by ideonexus

 The Sacrifices Necessary to be a Sports Star

But it’s better for us not to know the kinds of sacrifices the professional-grade athlete has made to get so very good at one particular thing... the actual facts of the sacrifices repel us when we see them: basketball geniuses who cannot read, sprinters who dope themselves, defensive tackles who shoot up with bovine hormones until they collapse or explode. We prefer not to consider closely the shockingly vapid and primitive comments uttered by athletes in post-contest interviews or to cons...
Folksonomies: sports kinesthetics
Folksonomies: sports kinesthetics
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A disturbing revelation. Possibly an overstatement or anecdotal, but the idea that total devotion to kinesthetic intelligence comes at the cost of other forms of intellect makes sense.

30 JUL 2013 by ideonexus

 Aristotle as the First Scientist

Aristotle repeatedly pointed out that his predecessors' work and conclusions were often marred by insufficient observation. He himself, after a remarkable analysis of the reproduction of bees, states that he cannot arrive at certain conclusions because "the facts have not yet been sufficiently ascertained. And if at any future time they are ascertained, then credence must be given to the direct evidence rather than to the theories; and to the theories also, provided that the results which the...
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Classification of animals, empirical observations... he got much wrong, but to call into question his achievements for this is like criticizing the invention of Calculus because Newton believed in magic.