02 JAN 2014 by ideonexus

 The Silver Rule

己所不欲,勿施於人。 "What you do not wish for yourself, do not do to others." 子貢問曰:“有一言而可以終身行之者乎”?子曰:“其恕乎!己所不欲、勿施於人。” Zi Gong [a disciple] asked: "Is there any one word that could guide a person throughout life?" The Master replied: "How about 'reciprocity'! Never impose on others what you would not choose for yourself."
Folksonomies: virtue morals reciprocity
Folksonomies: virtue morals reciprocity
  1  notes

Inverse of the golden rule, "Do not do unto others what you would not have them do unto you."

15 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Leo Szilard's Ten Commandments

1. Recognize the connections of things and the laws of conduct of men so that you may know what you are doing. 2. Let your acts be directed toward a worthy goal but do not ask if they will reach it; they are to be models and examples, not a means to an end. 3. Speak to all men as you do to yourself, with no concern for the effect you make, so that you do not shut them out from your world, lest in isolation the meaning of life slips out if sight and you lose the belief in the perfection of t...
Folksonomies: meaning morals life purpose
Folksonomies: meaning morals life purpose
  1  notes

Deep and poetic.

05 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Huxley on a Bit of Scripture

As I stood behind the coffin of my little son the other day, with my mind bent on anything but disputation, the officiating minister read, as part of his duty, the words, 'If the dead rise not again, let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die.' I cannot tell you how inexpressibly they shocked me. Paul had neither wife nor child, or he must have known that his alternative involved a blasphemy against all that well best and noblest in human nature. I could have laughed with scorn. What! Because...
Folksonomies: morals
Folksonomies: morals
  1  notes

While standing at his son's coffin, he finds a passage read offensive for its implication that we devolve.

01 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Laws for Physicians in 1760 B.C.

If a physician make a large incision with an operating knife and cure it, or if he open a tumor (over the eye) with an operating knife, and saves the eye, he shall receive ten shekels in money. … If a physician make a large incision with an operating knife, and kill him, or open a tumor with an operating knife, and cut out the eye, his hands shall be cut off. ... If a physician heal the broken bone or diseased soft part of a man, the patient shall pay the physician five shekels in money.
Folksonomies: history ethics law morals
Folksonomies: history ethics law morals
  1  notes

Earliest known laws.

31 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 The Danger of Believing Unproven Things

... If I let myself believe anything on insufficient evidence, there may be no great harm done by the mere belief; it may be true after all, or I may never have occasion to exhibit it in outward acts. But I cannot help doing this great wrong towards Man, that I make myself credulous. The danger to society is not merely that it should believe wrong things, though that is great enough; but that it should become credulous, and lose the habit of testing things and inquiring into them; for then it...
Folksonomies: society empiricism morals
Folksonomies: society empiricism morals
  1  notes

Is that we fall into the habit of believing these things, the empirical knowledge we have crumbles, and we return to savagery.