25 OCT 2017 by ideonexus

 American and French Revolutions Led to Different Results

...the structure of a network determines its virality. As recent work by the social scientists Nicholas Christakis and James Fowler has shown, the contagiousness of a disease or an idea depends as much on a social network’s structure as on the inherent properties of the virus or meme. The history of the late eighteenth century illustrates that point well. The ideas that inspired both the American Revolution and the French Revolution were essentially the same, and both were transmitted throu...
Folksonomies: enlightenment history
Folksonomies: enlightenment history
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29 NOV 2016 by ideonexus

 Earthseed 51-55

51. Purpose unifies us PurposeUnifies us:It focuses our dreams,Guides our plans,Strengthens our efforts.PurposeDefines us,Shapes us,And offers usGreatness. ∞ = Δ 52. Make Peace To make peace with others,Make peace with yourself:Shape GodWith generosityAnd compassion.Minimize harm.Shield the weak.Treasure the innocent.Be true to the Destiny.Forgive your enemies.Forgive yourself. ∞ = Δ 53. Do the impossible We can,Each of us,Do the impossibleAs long as we can convince ourselvesThat it has...
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19 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 The Philosopher's Solace

...how admirably calculated is this view of the human race, emancipated from its chains, released alike from the dominion of chance, as well as from that of the enemies of its progress, and advancing with a firm and indeviate step in the paths of truth, to console the philosopher lamenting the errors, the flagrant acts of injustice, the crimes with which the earth is still polluted? It is the contemplation of this prospect that rewards him for all his efforts to assist the progress of reason ...
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The unstoppable perfectibility of the human race is almost a law of the Universe that no injustice in the present can undo.

08 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Religious Justification for Slavery

Slavery in America was perpetuated not merely by human badness but also by human blindness. ... Men convinced themselves that a system that was so economically profitable must be morally justifiable. ... Science was commandeered to prove the biological inferiority of the Negro. Even philosophical logic was manipulated [exemplified by] an Aristotlian syllogism: All men are made in the image of God; God, as everyone knows, is not a Negro; Therefore, the Negro is not a man.
Folksonomies: racism slavery
Folksonomies: racism slavery
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Based on an Aristotlian syllogism.

13 APR 2012 by ideonexus

 Darwin and Abraham Lincoln Were Born on the Same Day

Charles Darwin (fig. 4.1) was bom on the same day as Abraham Lincoln—February 12,1809. Like Lincoln, he was a liberating force for humankind, but instead of freeing people from slavery, he freed biology from the bondage of supernaturalism. Philosophers of science have long pointed to Darwinian evolution as the greatest scientific revolution within biology, comparable to the role of Newton's or Einstein's revolutionary ideas in physics or the plate tectonics revolution in geology. Before Dar...
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And they both freed humans from chains that bound them.

29 MAY 2011 by ideonexus

 Computers Illustrate Our Slavery to Memes

nfestations of mind viruses that chain us to information terminals, frantically aiding the replication of information, may well take over if we don't intervene. Do you think it's a far-fetched scenario of the future that humans could become slaves to a race of computers? Look inside any large office building and see how many people spend eight hours a day following the instructions on their display screen to the point of damaging their vision and injuring their hands from the strain. What ar...
Folksonomies: memetics internet computers
Folksonomies: memetics internet computers
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We spend all day pushing and replicating memes online, slaving away at our computers.

19 APR 2011 by ideonexus

 Science Virtue and its Impact on History

So proud men have thought, in all walks of life, since Giordano Bruno was burned alive for his cosmology on the Campo de' Fiori in 1600. They have gone about their work simply enough. The scientists among them did not set out to be moralists or revolutionaries. William Harvey and Huygens, Euler and Avogadro, Darwin and Willard Gibbs and Marie Curie, Planck and Pavlov, practised their crafts modestly and steadfastly. Yet the values they seldom spoke of shone out of their work and entered their...
Folksonomies: history science virtue
Folksonomies: history science virtue
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Scientists prove their virtue in their actions.