25 OCT 2017 by ideonexus

 Distracted and Obsessed with Politics

My Dear Wormwood, Be sure that the patient remains completely fixated on politics. Arguments, political gossip, and obsessing on the faults of people they have never met serves as an excellent distraction from advancing in personal virtue, character, and the things the patient can control. Make sure to keep the patient in a constant state of angst, frustration and general disdain towards the rest of the human race in order to avoid any kind of charity or inner peace from further developing. ...
  1  notes
21 NOV 2013 by ideonexus

 1945 Warning of Bacterial Antibiotic Resistance

But I would like to sound one note of warning. Penicillin is to all intents and purposes non-poisonous so there is no need to worry about giving an overdose and poisoning the patient. There may be a danger, though, in underdosage. It is not difficult to make microbes resistant to penicillin in the laboratory by exposing them to concentrations not sufficient to kill them, and the same thing has occasionally happened in the body. The time may come when penicillin can be bought by anyone in the...
  1  notes

At his Nobel lecture for discovering penicillin, Alexander Fleming warns that if you use, use enough to kill. Maiming the bacteria will make it resistant.

21 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Anesthesia Thwarts the Will of God

It is a curious and painful fact that almost all the completely futile treatments that have been believed in during the long history of medical folly have been such as caused acute suffering to the patient. When anesthetics were discovered, pious people considered them an attempt to evade the will of God. It was pointed out, however, that when God extracted Adam's rib He put him into a deep sleep. This proved that anesthetics are all right for men; women, however, ought to suffer, because of ...
Folksonomies: science religion
Folksonomies: science religion
  1  notes

But Biblical precedent is found in the book of Genesis to allow it for men.

21 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Doctors Should Pause Before Tending to Patients

When a doctor arrives to attend some patient of the working class, he ought not to feel his pulse the moment he enters, as is nearly always done without regard to the circumstances of the man who lies sick; he should not remain standing while he considers what he ought to do, as though the fate of a human being were a mere trifle; rather let him condescend to sit down for awhile.
Folksonomies: medicine
Folksonomies: medicine
  1  notes

And consider that it is a a human being they are tending to.

04 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Hippocratic Oath

Into whatsoever houses I enter, I will enter to help the sick, and I will abstain from all intentional wrong-doing and harm, especially from abusing the bodies of man or woman, bond or free. And whatsoever I shall see or hear in the course of my profession, as well as outside my profession in my intercourse with men, if it be what should not be published abroad, I will never divulge, holding such things to be holy secrets.
Folksonomies: oath
Folksonomies: oath
  1  notes

Note how keeping the patient's privacy is important.

30 MAY 2012 by ideonexus

 Perspectives on the Physician

When Death lurks at the door, the physician is considered as a God. When danger has been overcome, the physician is looked upon as an angel. When the patient begins to convalesce, the physician becomes a mere human. When the physician asks for his fees, he is considered as the devil himself.
Folksonomies: culture medicine
Folksonomies: culture medicine
   notes

Quoting Hendrick Goltzius In Harper's Magazine (1931-32), 164, 512

08 FEB 2012 by ideonexus

 Surgeons are Like Astronauts

So much goes into doing a transplant operation. All the way from preparing the patient, to procuring the donor. It's like being an astronaut. The astronaut gets all the credit, he gets the trip to the moon, but he had nothing to do with the creation of the rocket, or navigating the ship. He's the privileged one who gets to drive to the moon. I feel that way in some of these more difficult operations, like the heart transplant.
Folksonomies: surgery
Folksonomies: surgery
  1  notes

They prepare using the ideas of others and execute them, and then are the heroes.

31 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 Stones Speak Through Geology

For a billion years the patient earth amassed documents and inscribed them with signs and pictures which lay unnoticed and unused. Today, at last, they are waking up, because man has come to rouse them. Stones have begun to speak, because an ear is there to hear them. Layers become history and, released from the enchanted sleep of eternity, life's motley, never-ending dance rises out of the black depths of the past into the light of the present.
Folksonomies: geology
Folksonomies: geology
  1  notes

The Earth has been writing into the strata, and now humans have arisen to read it.

04 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 A Very Qualified Statement on Experimenting on Patients

I think it perfectly just, that he who, from the love of experiment, quits an approved for an uncertain practice, should suffer the full penalty of Egyptian law against medical innovation; as I would consign to the pillory, the wretch, who out of regard to his character, that is, to his fees, should follow the routine, when, from constant experience he is sure that his patient will die under it, provided any, not inhuman, deviation would give his patient a chance.
  1  notes

Dr. Thomas Beddoes condemns experiments for the sake of experiments, but appears to leave an opening for humane deviations from treatments where the doctor knows from repeated experience that the treatment does not work.

14 SEP 2011 by ideonexus

 The First Patient to Undergo Ether Was a Hero

Here the most sublime scene ever witnessed in the operating room was presented when the patient placed himself voluntarily upon the table, which was to become the altar of future fame. … The heroic bravery of the man who voluntarily placed himself upon the table, a subject for the surgeon’s knife, should be recorded and his name enrolled upon parchment, which should be hung upon the walls of the surgical amphitheatre in which the operation was performed. His name was Gilbert Abbott.
  1  notes

Quoting Washington O. Ayer's description of the first public demonstration of ether at the Massachussetts General Hospital (16 Oct 1846).