18 MAY 2017 by ideonexus

 Emergent Curriculum

Whereas teachers and school boards typically decide in advance what knowledge children should receive based on their age, emergent curriculum is the technique of letting topics for study arise out of student interests and actions. Curriculum becomes what actually happens, rather than what was planned to happen. After all, children design their own “curriculum” all the time, simply by playing in, exploring, and studying the world. In schools inspired by the Italian Reggio-Emilia approach, ...
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24 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Busyness Correlated with Improved Cognitive Performance

Sustained engagement in mentally challenging activities has been shown to improve memory in older adults. We hypothesized that a busy schedule would be a proxy for an engaged lifestyle and would facilitate cognition. Here, we examined the relationship between busyness and cognition in adults aged 50–89. Participants (N = 330) from the Dallas Lifespan Brain Study (DLBS) completed a cognitive battery and the Martin and Park Environmental Demands Questionnaire (MPED), an assessment of busyness...
Folksonomies: cognition aging
Folksonomies: cognition aging
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14 MAR 2016 by ideonexus

 One in 1,000 to 500 Chance of Cancer from Childhood CT Scan

The first study to assess directly the risk of cancer after CT scans in childhood found a clear dose-response relationship for both leukemia and brain tumors: risk increased with increasing cumulative radiation dose. For a cumulative dose of between 50 and 60 milligray or mGy (mGy is a unit of estimated absorbed dose of ionizing radiation) to the head, the investigators reported a threefold increase in the risk of brain tumors; the same dose to bone marrow (the part of the body responsible fo...
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14 MAR 2016 by ideonexus

 1.9 Cases of Leukemia per 10,000 CT Scans in Children

In the breakdown of results, the study authors from Group Health Research Institute and University of California, Davis note that the risk of developing leukemia was highest from head scans for kids under age 5 with a rate of 1.9 cases per 10,000 CT scans. Younger children and girls seemed more susceptible to solid cancers than older kids and boys. Every 300 to 390 scans of a girl’s abdomen or pelvis was associated with the development of one solid cancer. The study estimates that 4,870 fut...
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21 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 Children Are Naturally Skeptical of Santa Claus

First, researchers asked children between the ages of 3 and 9 about the possibility of various extraordinary events, some possible and some impossible. None of the events were related to Santa or to Christmas. (Shtulman used his own 4-year-old son as a “data point” in the study.) Next, the researchers asked children to help write a letter to Santa. Although children were free to include whatever they wanted, they were specifically encouraged to ask Santa some questions. “What we found...
Folksonomies: skepticism parenting
Folksonomies: skepticism parenting
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04 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 An Algorithm for Predicting Longevity

For the test, participants exercised on a treadmill at increasing speed and incline. While they were exercising, the researches measured peak heart rate (%MPHR) and their ability to withstand physical exertion. On that latter point, they measured metabolic equivalents, or METs, which gauges how much energy the body expends during exercise. The more intense the exercise, the higher the METs (e.g. slow walking = ~2 METs, whereas running = ~8 METs). [...] FIT Treadmill Score = %MPHR 12(M...
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You can get your MPHR for your age here. I found a chart of METS here for various exercises.


Activity METS Activity METS
Aerobic Dancing 6.0 Running 12 min/mile 8.5
Backpacking 7.0 Racquetball 8.0
Badminton 7.0 Rugby 8.3
Basketball 6.0 Skating ice/roller 7.0
Bicycling - 24mph 5.0 Skiing cross country 8.0
Calisthenics 4.5 Soccer 8.0
Golf 5.0 Softball 5.0
Gymnastics 5.5 Swimming 6.0
Handball 8.0 Tennis 7.0
Hockey 8.0 Volleyball 4.0
Horse riding 3.5 Walking 3.5
Running 8 min/mile 12.5 Weight lifting 4.5

Bruce Protocol


Stage Minutes % grade km/h MPH METS
1 3 10 2.7 1.7 5
2 3 12 4.0 2.5 7
3 3 14 5.4 3.4 10
4 3 16 6.7 4.2 13
5 3 18 8.0 5.0 15
6 3 20 8.8 5.5 18
7 3 22 9.6 6.0 20


Total Durations = 21 minutes


So, if I'm understanding this correctly. If I reach a 160 heart rate out of 179.0 MPHR predicted for my 41 years of age while running 12 minute miles worth 8.5 METS. My score would be:

83.7 12(8.5) - 4(41) = 21.7

The same heart rate for my age running 8 minute miles:

83.7 12(8.5) - 4(41) = 69.7

24 JAN 2014 by ideonexus

 Science Should be Accessible to All

The circulation of accurate and meaningful natural science ideas is of vital concern to our age. These are abundant in science but scarce in society. They should be rendered accessible to all. . . without education in natural science it is impossible to develop a strong intellect.... By placing natural science at the beginning of a course of education we would cleanse the child's mind of all prejudices; we would raise him on healthful food until the time when, strong of intellect . . . and re...
Folksonomies: enlightenment education
Folksonomies: enlightenment education
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The importance of universal public education.

30 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Gompertz Law of human mortality

What do you think are the odds that you will die during the next year? Try to put a number to it — 1 in 100? 1 in 10,000? Whatever it is, it will be twice as large 8 years from now. This startling fact was first noticed by the British actuary Benjamin Gompertz in 1825 and is now called the “Gompertz Law of human mortality.” Your probability of dying during a given year doubles every 8 years. For me, a 25-year-old American, the probability of dying during the next year is a fairly ...
Folksonomies: statistics mortality
Folksonomies: statistics mortality
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Your chances of dying double every eight years.

20 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Newton on the Power of Gravity

As he sat alone in a garden, he [Isaac Newton in 1666, age 24] fell into a speculation on the power of gravity; that as this power is not found sensibly diminished at the remotest distance from the centre of the earth to which we can rise, neither at the tops of the loftiest buildings, nor even on the summits of the highest mountains, it appeared to him reasonable to conclude that this power must extend much further than was usually thought: why not as high as the moon? said he to himself; an...
Folksonomies: history discovery gravity
Folksonomies: history discovery gravity
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Wondering if it extended up to the moon.

11 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 If Time is the Eiffle Tower, Then Man is the Paint on the...

Man has been here 32,000 years. That it took a hundred million years to prepare the world for him is proof that that is what it was done for. I suppose it is, I dunno. If The Eiffel Tower were now to represent the world's age, the skin of paint on the pinnacle knob at its summit would represent man's share of that age; and anybody would perceive that the skin was what the tower was built for. I reckon they would, I dunno.
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And would we assume the paint was the purpose of the tower?