08 JAN 2018 by ideonexus

 Our Life is What We Pay Attention To

When our attention is lured, herded, and commandeered in such a way, our full human potential is profoundly subverted. “Our life experience,” William James once said, “will equal what we have paid attention to, whether by choice or default.” We become what we attend to — nothing more, nothing less. A steady and exclusive stream of reality TV, entertainment gossip, social media chatter, and “breaking news” about the latest celebrity scandal or Trump’s most recent tweets — all...
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25 MAY 2015 by ideonexus

 Laura Betzig: Culture

What if the 100,000-odd year-old evidence of human social life—from the arrowheads in South Africa, to the Venus figurines at Dordogne—is the effect of nothing, more or less, but our efforts to become parents? What if the 10,000-odd year-old record of civilization—from the tax accounts at temples in the Near East, to the inscription on a bronze statue in New York Harbor—is the product of nothing, more or less, but our struggle for genetic representation in future generations? [...] ...
Folksonomies: atheism secularism cuture
Folksonomies: atheism secularism cuture
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29 MAY 2011 by ideonexus

 Computers Illustrate Our Slavery to Memes

nfestations of mind viruses that chain us to information terminals, frantically aiding the replication of information, may well take over if we don't intervene. Do you think it's a far-fetched scenario of the future that humans could become slaves to a race of computers? Look inside any large office building and see how many people spend eight hours a day following the instructions on their display screen to the point of damaging their vision and injuring their hands from the strain. What ar...
Folksonomies: memetics internet computers
Folksonomies: memetics internet computers
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We spend all day pushing and replicating memes online, slaving away at our computers.

18 MAY 2011 by ideonexus

 A Novel Way to Teach the Constitution

Daniel Kunitz is a friend of mine from college. He's spent his life as an innovative junior and senior high school social sciences teacher. Want the students to understand the Constitution of the United States? You could have them read it, Article by Article, and then discuss it in class but, sadly, this will put most of them to sleep. Or you could try the Kunitz method: you forbid the students to read the Constitution. Instead, you assign them, two for each state, to attend a Constitutional ...
Folksonomies: politics education
Folksonomies: politics education
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Have the children play delegates to the convention and have them produce their own Constitution.