The Wonder is All Around You

Memes from scientists about the beauty and wonder all around us.

Folksonomies: enlightenment science manifesto wonder

Memes

30 DEC 2013

 Science Can Never Weary the Mind

Unlike religion, Science can never weary the mind: the dreary monotony of the former is a perfect contrast to the life-inspiring power of the latter. Every step you take in Science, stimulates you to further pursuit. The vast volume of nature, that book of books, that only revelation worthy the attention of man, is always open to the Man of Science; and in this book the child can find a language that shall be intelligible, and adapted to his youthful capacity. He can read here without stupify...
Folksonomies: science wonder awe
Folksonomies: science wonder awe
  1  notes

The sense of wonder and awe can only lead to the pursuit of more wonder and awe.

23 JUN 2013

 Why You Lose Weight While You Sleep

Here's a simple question: Why do you weigh more when you go to sleep than when you wake up? Because you do... You can check this yourself. Somehow, while doing absolutely nothing all night but sleep, you will wake up lighter. [...] All night long, every time you breathe out, a bunch of carbon atoms, formerly inside your body, leave your insides and take off into the night air. You breathe in oxygen, O2. You breathe out carbon dioxide, (two oxygen atoms with a carbon atom attached), so there...
 2  2  notes

Over the course of the night, through respiration, you lose a pound of weight to the carbon atoms in Carbon Dioxide.

23 JUN 2013

 An Elegant Complex Description of Fire

The atoms like each other to different degrees. Oxygen, for instance in the air, would like to be next to carbon, and if they get near to each other, they snap together. If they’re not too close though, they repel and they go apart, so they don’t know that they could snap together. It’s just as if you had a ball, it was trying to climb a hill and there was a hole it could go into, like a volcano hole, a deep one. It’s rolling along, it doesn’t go down in the deep hole, because if it...
Folksonomies: nature wonder explanations
Folksonomies: nature wonder explanations
  1  notes

From Richard Feynman, making the process of burning wood seem wondrous.

20 JUN 2012

 Science Inspires a Love of Life and Morality

Science enhances the moral value of life, because it furthers a love of truth and reverence—love of truth displaying itself in the constant endeavor to arrive at a more exact knowledge of the world of mind and matter around us, and reverence, because every advance in knowledge brings us face to face with the mystery of our own being.
Folksonomies: science meaning morality
Folksonomies: science meaning morality
  1  notes

Because knowledge brings us face to face with the mystery of our existence.

08 JUN 2012

 The Formation of Grains of Sand

On the basis of the results recorded in this review, it can be claimed that the average sand grain has taken many hundreds of millions of years to lose 10 per cent. of its weight by abrasion and become subangular. It is a platitude to point to the slowness of geological processes. But much depends on the way things are put. For it can also be said that a sand grain travelling on the bottom of a river loses 10 million molecules each time it rolls over on its side and that representation impres...
Folksonomies: wonder numbers
Folksonomies: wonder numbers
  1  notes

Miraculous in numbers.

29 MAY 2012

 Nature Works in Increments

Whatever Nature undertakes, she can only accomplish it in a sequence. She never makes a leap. For example she could not produce a horse if it were not preceded by all the other animals on which she ascends to the horse's structure as if on the rungs of a ladder. Thus every one thing exists for the sake of all things and all for the sake of one; for the one is of course the all as well. Nature, despite her seeming diversity, is always a unity, a whole; and thus, when she manifests herself in a...
Folksonomies: evolution science
Folksonomies: evolution science
  1  notes

All living things rely on the chain of all other living things before them.

18 MAR 2012

 Pride in Evolutionary Ancestry

How I hate the man who talks about the 'brute creation', with an ugly emphasis on Brute. Only Christians are capable of it. As for me, I am proud of my close kinship with other animals. I take a jealous pride in my Simian ancestry. I like to think that I was once a magnificent hairy fellow living in the trees and that my frame has come down through geological time via sea jelly and worms and Amphioxus, Fish, Dinosaurs, and Apes. Who would exchange these for the pallid couple in the Garden of ...
Folksonomies: evolution enlightenment
Folksonomies: evolution enlightenment
  1  notes

Cummings takes pride in descending from arboreal ancestors and distant jellyfish.

17 MAR 2012

 Equations are Treasures

Equations seem like treasures, spotted in the rough by some discerning individual, plucked and examined, placed in the grand storehouse of knowledge, passed on from generation to generation. This is so convenient a way to present scientific discovery, and so useful for textbooks, that it can be called the treasure-hunt picture of knowledge.
  1  notes

Found in nature, plucked and put in a display case for others to admire.

02 JAN 2012

 Herschel Sees Spirituality in Science

To the natural philosopher there is no natural object unimportant or trifling … A mind that has once imbibed a taste for scientific enquiry has within itself an inexhaustible source of pure and exciting contemplations. One would think that Shakespeare had such a mind in view when he describes a contemplative man finding Tongues in trees — books in the running brooks Sermons in stones — and good in everything Where the uninformed and unenquiring eye perceives neither novelty nor beau...
Folksonomies: philosophy naturalism
Folksonomies: philosophy naturalism
  1  notes

Everything in nature is interesting and significant.

02 JAN 2012

 Mungo Park Saved by a Moment of Scientific Fascination

Park travelled on down the river as far as Silla, where, exhausted, he decided to turn back short of Timbuctoo on 25 August 1796. On the return journey he was robbed and stripped by Moorish banditti in ‘a dark wood’ before he reached Kalamia. They took everything — his horse, his compass, his hat, all his clothes except his trousers and his battered boots (‘the sole of one of them was tied onto my foot with a broken bridle rein’). They had evidently intended to kill him, but saw him...
  1  notes

Park's situation is dire at one point in his explorations of Africa, but he finds a fascinating bit of moss that enchants him and makes him forget his horrible situation.

01 JAN 2012

 The Wonders of the Universe

There is a place with four suns in the sky – red, white, blue, and yellow; two of them are so close together that they touch, and star-stuff flows between them. I know of a world with a million moons. I know of a sun the size of the Earth – and made of diamond. There are atomic nuclei a mile across that rotate thirty times a second. There are tiny grains between the stars, with the size and atomic composition of bacteria. There are stars leaving the Milky Way. There are immense gas c...
Folksonomies: astronomy universe wonders
Folksonomies: astronomy universe wonders
  1  notes

Carl Sagan describes some of the amazing things science and astronomy have discovered in our universe.

21 SEP 2011

 A Noble and Enlightened Way to Spend our Short Time

After sleeping through a hundred million centuries we have finally opened our eyes on a sumptuous planet, sparkling with color, bountiful with life. Within decades we must close our eyes again. Isn’t it a noble, an enlightened way of spending our brief time in the sun, to work at understanding the universe and how we have come to wake up in it? This is how I answer when I am asked—as I am surprisingly often—why I bother to get up in the mornings.
  1  notes

Understanding the universe and how we have come to wake up in it.

06 SEP 2011

 Palaeontology is the Aladdin's Lamp of Deserted and Lifel...

Palaeontology is the Aladdin's lamp of the most deserted and lifeless regions of the earth; it touches the rocks and there spring forth in orderly succession the monarchs of the past and the ancient river streams and savannahs wherein they flourished. The rocks usually hide their story in the most difficult and inaccessible places.
Folksonomies: exploration paleontology
Folksonomies: exploration paleontology
  1  notes

Revealing order and history from the barren rocks.

01 SEP 2011

 The Forces of the Cosmos are Within Ourselves

When I investigate and when I discover that the forces of the heavens and the planets are within ourselves, then truly I seem to be living among the gods. ~ Leon Battista Alberti
  1  notes

We are among the gods.

10 JUN 2011

 We Should Appreciate the Winter Solstice

We have become too wise in our own conceits if ever we let a winter solstice go by without a glance upward to rejoice that the sun will sink no lower in the darkening sky . .. We walk too hurriedly if ever we pass the season’s first pasqueflower by, too busy to let its meeting stay us for a quiet moment before this token of the covenant of life to continue in beauty despite the storm.
  1  notes

It's a shame if we do not at least glance up at the sky to appreciate the fact that the days will be getting longer.

10 JUN 2011

 Teddy Roosevelt Considers the Night Sky

After an evening of talk, perhaps about the fringes of knowledge, or some new possibility of climbing inside the minds and senses of animals, we would go out on the lawn, where we took turns at an amusing little astronomical rite. We searched until we found, with or without glasses, the faint, heavenly spot of light-mist beyond the lower left-hand comer of the Great Square of Pegasus, when one or the other of us would then recite: That is the Spiral Galaxy in Andromeda. It is as large as our...
  1  notes

...each night to feel appropriately small.

09 JUN 2011

 If the Stars Only Came Out One Night in 1,000 Years

If the Stars should appear one night in a thousand years, how would men believe and adore; and preserve for many generations the remembrance of the city of God which had been shown! But every night come out these envoys of beauty, and light the universe with their admonishing smile.
Folksonomies: nature vision astronomy
Folksonomies: nature vision astronomy
 2  2  notes

This Emerson quote begs the question: What if we lived on a planet like Venus, where perpetual cloud coverage obscures the skies?

08 JUN 2011

 A Beautiful Quote on Wonder

31 I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journey work of the stars, And the pismire is equally perfect, and a grain of sand, and the egg of the wren, And the tree-toad is a chef-d'oeuvre for the highest, And the running blackberry would adorn the parlors of heaven, And the narrowest hinge in my hand puts to scorn all machinery, And the cow crunching with depress'd head surpasses any statue, And a mouse is miracle enough to stagger sextillions of infidels.
Folksonomies: nature wonder poetry prose
Folksonomies: nature wonder poetry prose
  2  notes

From Walt Whitman on the wonder all around us. Especially enjoy the "a leaf of grass is no less than the journey-work of the stars" part.

08 JUN 2011

 The Potentiality of Matter

Early in the twenty-first century, the old dualism of matter and spirit seems irrelevant. In the new theories of physicists, the fundamental material particles—protons, neutrons, electrons—dissolve into a kind of cosmic music, all resonances, vibrations, and spooky entanglements. Matter has revealed itself as a thing of astonishing, almost immaterial subtlety The one property of matter that lingers is its potentiality. The hydrogen and helium atoms forged in the Big Bang possessed a built...
Folksonomies: nature physics wonder
Folksonomies: nature physics wonder
  1  notes

From simple hydrogen atoms, it is incredible what can become of matter.

02 JUN 2011

 The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. He who knows it not and can no longer wonder, no longer feel amazement, is as good as dead, a snuffed-out candle. It was the experience of mystery — even if mixed with fear — that engendered religion. A knowledge of the existence of something we cannot penetrate, of the manifestations of the profoundest reason and the most radiant beauty, which are ...
Folksonomies: religion wonder naturalism
Folksonomies: religion wonder naturalism
  2  notes

Einstein describes the spiritual wonder of exploring nature, compared to the idea of a personal god.

18 MAY 2011

 Wonder of the Natural World

Sun's nature as revealed by modern science far more wonderful: no mere angels or gold coin, but an enormous sphere into which a million Earths could be packed, in the core of which the hidden nuclei of atoms are being jammed together, hydrogen transfigured into helium, the energy latent in hydrogen for billions of years released, the Earth and other planets warmed and lit thereby, and the same process repeated four hundred billion times elsewhere in the Milky Way galaxy? The blueprints, deta...
Folksonomies: science wonder
Folksonomies: science wonder
  1  notes

Scientific explanations are so much more enchanting than supernatural.

08 MAY 2011

 Science is a Profound Source of Spirituality

In its encounter with Nature, science invariably elicits a sense of reverence and awe. The very act of understanding is a celebration of joining, merging, even if on a very modest scale, with the magnificence of the Cosmos. And the cumulative worldwide build-up of knowledge over time converts science into something only a littles short of a trans-national, trans-generational meta-mind. [...] Science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality. When we r...
  1  notes

Science instills a sense of awe and reverence, much like religion instills in its followers.

11 APR 2011

 Atoms Within Our Bodies Still Release the Energy of an An...

Explosions are seldom one hundred per cent efficient. When a star ends as a supernova, the nuclear explosive material, which includes uranium and plutonium together with large amounts of iron and other burnt-out elements, is distributed around and scattered in space just as is the dust cloud from a hydrogen bomb test. Perhaps the strangest fact of all about our planet is that it consists largely of lumps of fall-out from a star-sized hydrogen bomb. Even today, aeons later, there is still enou...
  1  notes

High amounts of uranium in the Earth's core suggest our sun was in the vicinity of a supernova event, and the atoms within our bodies, if measured with a Geiger counter, can be found to still be releasing the energy from that event.

05 APR 2011

 The Many Ways the Universe Observes Itself

On this planet, and probably countless more, inanimate atoms became molecules which formed cells and over billions of years those cells evolved into complex organisms which finally became viruses, plants, animals, salamanders, banyan trees and human beings. Without giving it any thought, with no way to think it, the universe brought into existence a way of making itself seen. There is more than one way to see. A leaf turns to the light. A chimpanzee selects a piece of fruit. A fish sees a sm...
  1  notes

The Universe, without consciousness, evolved living things with consciousness and the ability to experience the Universe in a multitude of ways.

03 JAN 2011

 The Beauty of Science

The world looks so different after learning science. For example, the trees are made of air, primarily. When they are burned, they go back to air, and in the flaming heat is relased the flaming heat of the sun which was bound in to convert the air into trees, and in the ash is the small remnant of the part which did not come from air, that came from the solid earth instead.
  1  notes

We can see the world much more deeply after learning science.

01 JAN 2010

 For Deists, A Fulfilling, Engaging Life Requires Science

To be happy in old age it is necessary that we accustom ourselves to objects that can accompany the mind all the way through life, and that we take the rest as good in their day. The mere man of pleasure is miserable in old age; and the mere drudge in business is but little better: whereas, natural philosophy, mathematical and mechanical science, are a continual source of tranquil pleasure, and in spite of the gloomy dogmas of priests, and of superstition, the study of those things is the stu...
Folksonomies: spiritual naturalism
Folksonomies: spiritual naturalism
  1  notes
Thomas Paine on why Ben Franklin was always alive and active in life, because he always had science to inspire him. Without it, he would have gone senile.


References

30 DEC 2013

 An Address to Men of Science

Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Carlile, Richard (1821), An Address to Men of Science, Retrieved on 2013-12-30
  • Source Material [books.google.com]
  • Folksonomies: science
    Folksonomies: science
     8  
    23 JUN 2013

     Richard Feynman Fire

    Audiovisual Media>Television Broadcast:  Feynman, Richard (Unknown), Richard Feynman Fire, Retrieved on 2013-06-23
  • Source Material [lybio.net]
  • Folksonomies: biology wonder
    Folksonomies: biology wonder
     1  
    23 JUN 2013

     Every Night You Lose More Than A Pound While You're Aslee...

    Electronic/World Wide Web>Internet Article:  Krulwich, Robert (June 21, 2013), Every Night You Lose More Than A Pound While You're Asleep (For The Oddest Reason), National Public Radio, Retrieved on 2013-06-23
  • Source Material [www.npr.org]
  • Folksonomies: biology respiration
    Folksonomies: biology respiration
     1  
    20 JUN 2012

     Where is science going?

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Planck, Max (1932), Where is science going?, Retrieved on 2012-06-20
  • Source Material [books.google.com]
  • Folksonomies: philosophy
    Folksonomies: philosophy
     1  
    08 JUN 2012

     Sand-its Origin, Transportation, Abrasion and Accumulation

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Kuenen, Phillip H. (1956), Sand-its Origin, Transportation, Abrasion and Accumulation, The Geological Society of South Africa, Retrieved on 2012-06-08
  • Source Material [books.google.com]
  •  1  
    29 MAY 2012

     Goethe On Science: An Anthology of Goethe's Scientific Wr...

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Goethe , Johann Wolfgang von and Naydler , Jeremy (1996-01), Goethe On Science: An Anthology of Goethe's Scientific Writings, Retrieved on 2012-05-29
  • Source Material [books.google.com]
  • Folksonomies: literary criticism
    Folksonomies: literary criticism
     1  
    18 MAR 2012

     The Journal of a Disappointed Man

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Cummings, Bruce F. (1919), The Journal of a Disappointed Man, 27-8, Retrieved on 2012-03-18
  • Source Material [books.google.com]
  • Folksonomies: english authors
    Folksonomies: english authors
     1  
    17 MAR 2012

     The great equations

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Crease , Robert P. (2009-01-18), The great equations, W. W. Norton & Company, Retrieved on 2012-03-17
  • Source Material [books.google.com]
  • Folksonomies:
    Folksonomies:
     1  
    02 JAN 2012

     The Age of Wonder

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Holmes , Richard (2010-03-02), The Age of Wonder, Vintage, Retrieved on 2012-01-02
  • Source Material [books.google.com]
  •  43  
    02 JAN 2012

     A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Herschel , John Frederick William (1831), A Preliminary Discourse on the Study of Natural Philosophy, Retrieved on 2012-01-02
  • Source Material [books.google.com]
  • Folksonomies: astronomy naturalism
    Folksonomies: astronomy naturalism
     1  
    01 JAN 2012

     Carl Sagan's cosmic connection

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Sagan , Carl (2000-10-23), Carl Sagan's cosmic connection, Cambridge Univ Pr, Retrieved on 2012-01-01
  • Source Material [books.google.com]
  • Folksonomies: science
    Folksonomies: science
     33  
    21 SEP 2011

     Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, Delusion and the Appetite...

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Dawkins, Richard (2000-04-05), Unweaving the Rainbow: Science, Delusion and the Appetite for Wonder, Mariner Books, Retrieved on 2011-09-21
    Folksonomies: evolution science
    Folksonomies: evolution science
     20  
    06 SEP 2011

     On the trail of ancient man: A narrative of the field wor...

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Andrews , Roy Chapman (1926), On the trail of ancient man: A narrative of the field work of the Central Asiatic Expeditions, Putnam, Retrieved on 2011-09-06
    Folksonomies: paleontology
    Folksonomies: paleontology
     2  
    01 SEP 2011

     History of Italian literature

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Sanctis , Francesco De (1968), History of Italian literature, Barnes & Noble, Retrieved on 2011-09-01
    Folksonomies: history
    Folksonomies: history
     1  
    10 JUN 2011

     The Book of Naturalists

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Beebe, William (1988-04-01), The Book of Naturalists, Princeton University Press, Retrieved on 2011-06-10
    Folksonomies: naturalism naturalist
    Folksonomies: naturalism naturalist
     1  
    10 JUN 2011

     Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, I...

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Rolston III, Holmes (2010-11-29), Nature, Value, Duty: Life on Earth with Holmes Rolston, III (The International Library of Environmental, Agricultural and Food Ethics), Springer, Retrieved on 2011-06-10
    Folksonomies: naturalism
    Folksonomies: naturalism
     1  
    09 JUN 2011

     Nature: Student Bargain Edition

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Emerson , Ralph Waldo (2010-09-09), Nature: Student Bargain Edition, CreateSpace, Retrieved on 2011-06-09
  • Source Material [www.emersoncentral.com]
  • Folksonomies: nature naturalism
    Folksonomies: nature naturalism
     1  
    08 JUN 2011

     Song of Myself: The First and Final Editions of the Great...

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Whitman , Walt (2011-02-04), Song of Myself: The First and Final Editions of the Great American Poem, CreateSpace, Retrieved on 2011-06-08
    Folksonomies: poetry naturalism
    Folksonomies: poetry naturalism
     2  
    08 JUN 2011

     The Path: A One-Mile Walk Through the Universe

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Raymo , Chet (2003-03-01), The Path: A One-Mile Walk Through the Universe, Walker & Company, Retrieved on 2011-06-08
    Folksonomies: science naturalism
    Folksonomies: science naturalism
     21  
    02 JUN 2011

     The World As I See It

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Einstein, Albert (2011-03-16), The World As I See It, Open Road / Philosophical Library, Retrieved on 2011-06-02
     1  
    04 MAY 2011

     The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Sagan , Carl and Druyan , Ann (1997-02-25), The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark, Ballantine Books, Retrieved on 2011-05-04
     48  
    11 APR 2011

     Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Lovelock, James (2000-11-23), Gaia: A New Look at Life on Earth, Oxford University Press, USA, Retrieved on 2011-04-11
     10  
    05 APR 2011

     A quintessence of dust

    Electronic/World Wide Web>Blog:  Ebert, Roger (March 30, 2011 7:21), A quintessence of dust, Chicago Tribune, Retrieved on 2011-04-05
  • Source Material [blogs.suntimes.com]
  •  2  
    03 JAN 2011

     What Is Science?

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book Chapter:  Feynman, Richard (1969), What Is Science?, The Physics Teacher, Vol 9, pp 313-320, American Association of Physics Teachers, Retrieved on 2010-11-13
     5  
    01 JAN 2010

     Age of Reason

    Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Paine, Thomas (1795), Age of Reason, Retrieved on -0001-11-30
     3