10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Religion of the Other Men

Science and industry had brought one of those sudden and extreme revolutions of thought which were so characteristic of the Other Men. Nearly all the churches were destroyed or turned into temporary factories or industrial museums. Atheism, lately persecuted, became fashionable. All the best minds turned agnostic. More recently, however, apparently in horror at the effects of a materialistic culture which was far more cynical and blatant than our own, the most industrialized peoples began to...
Folksonomies: religion otherness alien other
Folksonomies: religion otherness alien other
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 The Propagation of "Brute Men"

Many thousands of other quasi-human worlds, besides those of the "Echinoderm" type, came to an untimely end. One, which succumbed to a curious disaster, perhaps deserves brief notice. Here we found a race of very human kind. When its civilization had reached a stage and character much like our own, a stage in which the ideals of the masses are without the guidance of any well-established tradition, and in which natural science is enslaved to individualistic industry, biologists discovered the...
Folksonomies: otherness alien other
Folksonomies: otherness alien other
  1  notes
 
19 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 The Unmentioned Trade-Offs in Life Extention

Now it is not that the cell biologists can’t point to experiments which seem to fit their views, as is common in natural science. (After all, the Earth’s Moon does indeed have a geocentric orbit.) Good colleagues of mine like Robert Reis are able to produce nematode worms that live ten times longer than their unmutated controls, if they use ingenious genetic and environmental manipulation. But nematodes have well-developed physiological machinery for sustaining states of metabolic arrest,...
  1  notes

From Michael R. Rose's "Immortalist Fictions and Strategies"

24 JAN 2014 by ideonexus

 Science Should be Accessible to All

The circulation of accurate and meaningful natural science ideas is of vital concern to our age. These are abundant in science but scarce in society. They should be rendered accessible to all. . . without education in natural science it is impossible to develop a strong intellect.... By placing natural science at the beginning of a course of education we would cleanse the child's mind of all prejudices; we would raise him on healthful food until the time when, strong of intellect . . . and re...
Folksonomies: enlightenment education
Folksonomies: enlightenment education
  1  notes

The importance of universal public education.

02 JAN 2014 by ideonexus

 Human History is One of Neccessity VS Freedom

The history of mankind is one of continuous development from the realm of necessity to the realm of freedom. This process is never-ending. In any society in which classes exist class struggle will never end. In classless society the struggle between the new and the old and between truth and falsehood will never end. In the fields of the struggle for production and scientific experiment, mankind makes constant progress and nature undergoes constant change, they never remain at the same level. ...
  1  notes

And science is the tool that brings us increasing freedom.

08 JAN 2013 by ideonexus

 Science is Monism

Monism is the default worldview of natural science. In science, an explanation has to be grounded in empirical evidence. In a slightly different take, for a statement to be considered a scientific explanation, it must be falsifiable—there has to be some kind of test that could be applied to the statement to prove it wrong. For example, the statement that the moon is made of cheese is a scientific statement because it can be falsified. Facts can be brought to bear on the claim (such as the d...
Folksonomies: science monism
Folksonomies: science monism
  1  notes

Scientific statements must be falsifiable.

08 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Characteristics of a Good Surgeon

It is necessary that a surgeon should have a temperate and moderate disposition. That he should have well-formed hands, long slender fingers, a strong body, not inclined to tremble and with all his members trained to the capable fulfilment of the wishes of his mind. He should be of deep intelligence and of a simple, humble, brave, but not audacious disposition. He should be well grounded in natural science, and should know not only medicine but every part of philosophy; should know logic well...
Folksonomies: virtue
Folksonomies: virtue
  1  notes

A list of talents and virtues.

07 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Reason Requires Experimentation

Reason must approach nature with the view, indeed, of receiving information from it, not, however, in the character of a pupil, who listens to all that his master chooses to tell him, but in that of a judge, who compels the witnesses to reply to those questions which he himself thinks fit to propose. To this single idea must the revolution be ascribed, by which, after groping in the dark for so many centuries, natural science was at length conducted into the path of certain progress.
Folksonomies: experimentation reason
Folksonomies: experimentation reason
 1  1  notes

The observer must be actively engaged with nature, interrogating it, rather than playing the passive pupil.

05 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Survival of the Fittest Doesn't Apply to Animals in a Soc...

Such biological ideas as the 'survival of the fittest,' whatever their doubtful value in natural science, are utterly useless in attempting to understand society ... The life of a man in society, while it is incidentally a biological fact, has characteristics that are not reducible to biology and must be explained in the distinctive terms of a cultural analysis ... the physical well-being of men is a result of their social organization and not vice versa ... Social improvement is a product of...
Folksonomies: society social darwinism
Folksonomies: society social darwinism
  1  notes

Where all members rely on all other members.

23 APR 2012 by ideonexus

 Natural Science Consists of Facts

Natural science is founded on minute critical views of the general order of events taking place upon our globe, corrected, enlarged, or exalted by experiments, in which the agents concerned are placed under new circumstances, and their diversified properties separately examined. The body of natural science, then, consists of facts; is analogy,—the relation of resemblance of facts by which its different parts are connected, arranged, and employed, either for popular use, or for new speculati...
  1  notes

Sir Humphry Davy describes the scientific method.