28 FEB 2021 by ideonexus

 Adults Fear Leisure Because They Lose Control of the Cult...

In part, adults feared youth leisure because it symbolized rapid change and the inability of parents to control the culture of their o1spring, which seemed to be dominated by commercial entertainment. Commercialized youth leisure grew impressively during and after World War II. Parents away as soldiers or o1 at work lost control over their o1spring, and increased afluence encouraged commercialized play. In the 1950s, new technologies like the 45 rpm record and the transistor radio were quickl...
Folksonomies: parenting culture
Folksonomies: parenting culture
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Gamification Pattern Building Mechanic

Ms. Forsythe divides her class into four teams (Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome). Each team, over the course of the unit, learns about all four artistic cultures but becomes an expert in one. For a 20- to 30-minute exercise in discerning and judging the difference among these artistic cultures, Ms. Forsythe displays a piece of sculpture from each of the four cultures onto a large piece of heavy paper or cardboard and then cuts that image into smaller tiles and tosses all of the pieces to...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
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01 AUG 2013 by ideonexus

 Legal Perspective of "Semiotic Democracy"

"Cultural populists," . . . generally view popular culture as contested terrain in which individuals and groups (racial, ethnic, gender, class, etc.) struggle, albeit on unequal terms, to make and establish their own meanings and identities. As the populists see things, the consumers of cultural commodities (movies, songs, fashions, television programs, etc.) neither uniformly receive nor uncritically accept the "preferred meanings" that are generated and circulated by the culture industry. T...
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Also a way of saying "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder," in that entertainers have no control over how the viewer reinterprets their work.

15 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 Eclipse Phase References List

FICTION Ian Banks: The “Culture” Series, Consider Phlebas, The Use of Weapons, The Player of Games, The State of the Art, Inversions, Excession, Look to Windward, Matter Greg Bear: Moving Mars, Queen of Angels, Slant David Brin: Earth, The “Earthclan” series, Startide Rising, The Uplift War, Sundiver Paul Di Filippo: Ribofunk Cory Doctorow: Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom, Eastern Standard Tribe Greg Egan: Axiomatic, Diaspora, Distress, Permutation City, Quarantine Warren Ellis: Cro...
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A fantastic collection ficition, non-fiction, comics, and movies for anyone looking to learn about transhumanism and futurist thought.