20 MAR 2018 by ideonexus

 1.6 Grams of Protein a Day Per Kilogram of Weight

To answer the simplest question of whether taking in more protein during weight training led to larger increases in muscle size and strength, the researchers added all of the results together. [...] But those who did ramp up their protein gained an extra 10 percent or so in strength and about 25 percent in muscle mass compared to the control groups. The researchers also looked for the sweet spot for protein intake, which turned out to be about 1.6 grams of protein per kilogram of body weig...
Folksonomies: health strength longevity
Folksonomies: health strength longevity
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08 JUL 2016 by ideonexus

 Age-Related Decline in Strength as Decline Neurons

“What we have here is (a) failure to communicate,” said the Captain in the 1967 film Cool Hand Luke. This line rings true today as it relates to the failure of physiologists to communicate the mechanisms of muscle strength to the geriatrics community, where the lack of muscle strength observed in older adults holds high clinical significance. Similarly, there is a relative under recognition in the scientific community for the potential role of the brain’s failure to communicate with ske...
Folksonomies: cognition aging strength
Folksonomies: cognition aging strength
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As the neurons controlling muscle fibers die off, those muscles grow weaker. Possibly exercising muscles might keep signals going to those neurons and keep them alive, staving off age-related cognitive decline.

09 NOV 2015 by ideonexus

 Physiological Decline in the Body When You Stop Exercising

...regular endurance exercise leads to four major consequences: Increased ability of the heart to eject blood increased ability of the blood vessels to send blood to where blood is needed Increased number of capillaries (the vessels that deliver oxygen and ‘food’ to the muscles) increased size and the number of mitochondria (the “power plants” of the cells). All these changes lead to the more efficient use of oxygen, as well as nutrients. [...] Pino considers a person who can run...
Folksonomies: exercise fitness
Folksonomies: exercise fitness
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07 APR 2015 by ideonexus

 Evidence on Creatine

Strong scientific evidence for this use Enhanced muscle mass / strength: Several high-quality studies have shown an increase in muscle mass with creatine use. However, some weaker studies have reported mixed results. Overall, the available evidence suggests that creatine does increase lean body mass, strength, and total work. Future studies should include the effect of individual differences such as fitness levels, sex, and age. Unclear scientific evidence for this use Athletic performance...
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