29 DEC 2016 by ideonexus

 Science Fiction Gave Literature New Frontiers

The shift in subject matter from westerns to science fiction was probably already underway when Burroughs began writing. The frontier, which had been such a key feature of American popular fiction, was rapidly disappearing, and writers had begun looking for new frontiers—hence, the increasing number of stories about lost civilizations in unexplored parts of the world. But even the unexplored parts of the world were shrinking rapidly, and as new technologies, such as aircraft and rocketry, b...
Folksonomies: history science fiction
Folksonomies: history science fiction
  1  notes

Burroughs "Princess of Mars" even has the protagonist go from the Western frontier to a Martian desert. Wastelands are frontiers as well.

08 JUN 2016 by ideonexus

 We Are Living in a Science Fictional Age

1) We’re living in a science fictional era, thanks to all the incredible technological and scientific discoveries we’ve made. (At the time, we were just starting to discover exoplanets and sequence the DNA of individual people.) In some sense, science fiction has “come true.” 2) This means science fiction is uniquely qualified to comment on the era we’re living in, and is the only pop culture that accurately reflects the world around us. 3) Meanwhile, science fiction itself has cl...
  1  notes
 
10 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Characteristics of a Literacy-Building Classroom Library

• 300-600 books • Wide range of reading difficulty • Permanent “core” collection and regularly replenished “revolving” collection • Variety of genres • New books with appealing covers • Attractive, inviting setting The literature selection should include: • Traditional stories: Familiar stories that are found in every culture, including fables, folk tales, myths and legends • Fantasy: Stories that contain characters who may have superhuman powers that spark children...
Folksonomies: literacy reading library
Folksonomies: literacy reading library
  1  notes
 
26 JAN 2013 by ideonexus

 Sturgeon's Law

I repeat Sturgeon’s Revelation, which was wrung out of me after twenty years of wearying defense of science fiction against attacks of people who used the worst examples of the field for ammunition, and whose conclusion was that ninety percent of SF is crud.[1] Using the same standards that categorize 90% of science fiction as trash, crud, or crap, it can be argued that 90% of film, literature, consumer goods, etc. are crap. In other words, the claim (or fact) that 90% of science fiction is...
Folksonomies: art media law mass media
Folksonomies: art media law mass media
  1  notes

90% of everything is crap, be it film, literature, music, etc.