21 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Anesthesia Thwarts the Will of God

It is a curious and painful fact that almost all the completely futile treatments that have been believed in during the long history of medical folly have been such as caused acute suffering to the patient. When anesthetics were discovered, pious people considered them an attempt to evade the will of God. It was pointed out, however, that when God extracted Adam's rib He put him into a deep sleep. This proved that anesthetics are all right for men; women, however, ought to suffer, because of ...
Folksonomies: science religion
Folksonomies: science religion
  1  notes

But Biblical precedent is found in the book of Genesis to allow it for men.

02 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 Byron's Don Juan and Controversy

However, on receiving an early copy of the first canto of Byron’s Don Juan in 1819, Banks was outraged. ‘I never read so Lascivious a performance. No woman here will Confess that she has read it. We hitherto considered his Lordship only as an Atheist without morals. We now must add to his respectable Qualifications that of being a Profligate.’16 Yet had Banks lived to read the tenth canto (1821), he might well have been amused by His Lordship’s nimble mockery of Newton and the story o...
  1  notes

The poem pokes fun at Adam in the Garden of Eden, and predicts a hopeful future through science.

02 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 Newton's Apple Gave New Meaning to the Garden of Eden Story

Part of the power of the story was that it replaced the sacred Biblical account of the Fall from Innocence in Genesis (Eve and the apple) with a secular parable of the Ascent to Knowledge. See Patricia Fara, Newton: The Making of Genius (2005); and for a broad visionary perspective, Jacob Bronowski’s scientific classic The Ascent of Man (1973).
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The apple bequeathed knowledge to man in the secular fable of Newton observing the apple drop.

10 AUG 2011 by ideonexus

 Adam and Eve are a Religious Variable

“But…” Lyra struggled to find the words she wanted: “but it en’t true, is it? Not true like chemistry or engineering, not that kind of true? There wasn’t really an Adam and Eve? The Cassington Scholar told me it was just a kind of fairy tale.” “The Cassington Scholarship is traditionally given to a freethinker; it’s his function to challenge the faith of the Scholars. Naturally he’d say that. But think of Adam and Eve like an imaginary number, like the square root of minu...
Folksonomies: religion theology
Folksonomies: religion theology
  1  notes

Included in theistic equations the same way the square root of minus one is used in mathematics.