Unpublished Work>Publication of Limited Circulation:  Sagan , Carl (1994), Advocating science and hope : draft essay, Retrieved on 2014-03-03
  • Source Material [www.loc.gov]
  • Folksonomies: science public policy

    Memes

    03 MAR 2014

     The Danger of Scientific Ignorance in a Science-Based Civ...

    I have a foreboding of an America in my children's or grandchildren's time — when we're a service and information economy; when nearly all the key manufacturing industries have slipped away to other countries; when awesome technological powers are in the hands of a very few, and no one representing the public interest can even grasp the issues; when the people have lost the ability to set their own agendas or knowledgeably question those In authority; when, clutching our crystals and r...
      1  notes

    We are more reliant on science than ever before, but we are also most disdainful of it.

    03 MAR 2014

     The Success of Science

    One of the reasons for its success is that science has built-in, self-correcting machinery at its very heart. It takes account of human fallibility. One of its commandments is, "Mistrust arguments from authority." Too many such arguments have turned out to be painfully wrong. Authorities must prove their contentions like anybody else. This independence of science, its unwillingness to pay automatic obeisance to conventional wisdom, makes it dangerous to doctrines less self- critical. ...
      1  notes

    Comes from its built-in self-criticism, its proven results, and the reverence and awe it inspires.

    03 MAR 2014

     Science and Democracy are Synergistic

    The values of science and tha values of democracy are concordant, in many cases indistinguishable. Science confers power on anyone who takes the trouble to learn it. Science thrives on the free exchange of ideas; its values are antithetical to secrecy. Science holds to no special vantage points or privileged positions. Both science and democracy encourage unconventional opinions and vigorous debate. Both demand adeguate reason, coherent argument, rigorous standards of evidence and hones...
      1  notes

    The two concepts support one another.

    03 MAR 2014

     How to Explain Science

    As nearly as I can see, the only secret in popularising science (or anything else) is remembering what thinking went on in your head when you first really understood whatever it is you're now explaining: especially (1) what misunderstandings needed to be cleared away, (2) what metaphors and analogies proved helpful, and (3) what reassurance had to be offered. The effort involved is slight, the benefits great. Among the potential pitfalls are oversimplification, the need to be sparing w...
      1  notes

    Remember what was going on in your head when you first understood the thing.