05 JAN 2023 by ideonexus

 Identifying AI Online

Before you continue, pause and consider: How would you prove you're not a language model generating predictive text? What special human tricks can you do that a language model can't? 1. Triangulate objective reality [...] This leaves us with some low-hanging fruit for humanness. We can tell richly detailed stories grounded in our specific contexts and cultures: place names, sensual descriptions, local knowledge, and, well the je ne sais quoi of being alive. Language models can decently mim...
Folksonomies: ai auto-generated content
Folksonomies: ai auto-generated content
  1  notes

There are additional tactics for differentiating ourselves from AIs, but the first two were the most interesting to me.

05 JAN 2023 by ideonexus

 Web Gardens and Streams Elaborated

Caufield makes clear digital gardening is not about specific tools – it's not a Wordpress plugin, Gastby theme, or Jekyll template. It's a different way of thinking about our online behaviour around information - one that accumulates personal knowledge over time in an explorable space. Caufield's main argument was that we have become swept away by streams – the collapse of information into single-track timelines of events. The conversational feed design of email inboxes, group chats, and...
 1  1  notes
 
05 JAN 2023 by ideonexus

 The Garden and the Stream as Metaphors for WWW

The Garden is an old metaphor associated with hypertext. Those familiar with the history will recognize this. The Garden of Forking Paths from the mid-20th century. The concept of the Wiki Gardener from the 1990s. Mark Bernstein’s 1998 essay Hypertext Gardens. The Garden is the web as topology. The web as space. It’s the integrative web, the iterative web, the web as an arrangement and rearrangement of things to one another. Things in the Garden don’t collapse to a single set of relat...
 1  1  notes

The author will later call the memex the original garden.

05 JAN 2023 by ideonexus

 The Six Patterns of Digital Gardening

1. Topography over Timelines Gardens are organised around contextual relationships and associative links; the concepts and themes within each note determine how it's connected to others. [...] 2. Continuous Growth Gardens are never finished, they're constantly growing, evolving, and changing. Just like a real soil, carrot, and cabbage garden. [...] 3. Imperfection & Learning in Public Gardens are imperfect by design. They don't hide their rough edges or claim to be a permanent sour...
Folksonomies: digital gardening
Folksonomies: digital gardening
  1  notes

Summarized, strongly recommend reading the reference for the full, fleshed-out explanation of each.

05 JAN 2023 by ideonexus

 Recipe for Modernism

Here is the recipe: Look at a complex and confusing reality, such as the social dynamics of an old city Fail to understand all the subtleties of how the complex reality works Attribute that failure to the irrationality of what you are looking at, rather than your own limitations Come up with an idealized blank-slate vision of what that reality ought to look like Argue that the relative simplicity and platonic orderliness of the vision represents rationality Use authoritarian power to imp...
  1  notes
 
03 JAN 2023 by ideonexus

 Traits of Yoga Practice That Lead to Conspiracy Theories

Remski, the host of Conspirituality, noticed a number of yoga teachers flirting with QAnon during the early months of the pandemic. At first, he suspected it was a marketing ploy. With yoga studios around the country suddenly closed, teachers were forced to compete for the same online audience. But as the pandemic progressed, some teachers, like Guru Jagat, did not walk back their rhetoric. Of course, many people practice yoga without believing in conspiracy theories. However, yoga philosoph...
Folksonomies: conspiracy rabbit hole
Folksonomies: conspiracy rabbit hole
 1  1  notes
 
03 JAN 2023 by ideonexus

 Q'non as an AR Game

An alternate reality game begins when people notice “rabbit holes” — little details they happen across in the course of everyday life that don’t make sense, that seem like clues. Consider the game Why So Serious?, which was actually a marketing campaign for the 2008 Batman movie The Dark Knight. The game started when some fans at a comic book convention found dollar bills with the words “why so serious?,” and George Washington defaced to look like the Joker. Googling the phrase le...
Folksonomies: conspiracy rabbit hole
Folksonomies: conspiracy rabbit hole
 1  1  notes
 
16 DEC 2022 by ideonexus

 Luddite Club

“Lots of us have read this book called ‘Into the Wild,’” said Lola Shub, a senior at Essex Street Academy, referring to Jon Krakauer’s 1996 nonfiction book about the nomad Chris McCandless, who died while trying to live off the land in the Alaskan wilderness. “We’ve all got this theory that we’re not just meant to be confined to buildings and work. And that guy was experiencing life. Real life. Social media and phones are not real life.” “When I got my flip phone, things ...
Folksonomies: culture technology
Folksonomies: culture technology
  1  notes
 
19 NOV 2022 by ideonexus

 Critical Ignoring and Deliberate Ignorance

Low-quality and misleading information online can hijack people’s attention, often by evoking curiosity, outrage, or anger. Resisting certain types of information and actors online requires people to adopt new mental habits that help them avoid being tempted by attention-grabbing and potentially harmful content. We argue that digital information literacy must include the competence of critical ignoring—choosing what to ignore and where to invest one’s limited attentional capacities. We ...
  1  notes

An important educational paradigm.

01 OCT 2022 by ideonexus

 Third place

Oldenburg calls one's "first place" the home and the people the person lives with. The "second place" is the workplace—where people may actually spend most of their time. Third places, then, are "anchors" of community life and facilitate and foster broader, more creative interaction.[1] In other words, "your third place is where you relax in public, where you encounter familiar faces and make new acquaintances."[2] Other scholars have summarized Oldenburg's view of a third place with eight...
Folksonomies: community
Folksonomies: community
  1  notes