Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Barnes , Jonathan and Aristotle, (1983), Complete Works of Aristotle, The: The Revised Oxford Translation, Bollingen Foundation, Retrieved on 2011-09-09
Folksonomies: philosophy classic

Memes

09 SEP 2011

 Earth Processes Take Place Gradually and Over Long Period...

But the whole vital process of the earth takes place so gradually and in periods of time which are so immense compared with the length of our life, that these changes are not observed, and before their course can be recorded from beginning to end whole nations perish and are destroyed.
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From Aristotle's "Meteorology". Most processes of the Earth take place over time periods longer than human lifetimes and even eras of human existence.

09 SEP 2011

 Pursuit of Knowledge Comes from Being Free

For it is owing to their wonder that men now both begin and at first began to philosophize; they wondered originally at the obvious difficulties, then advanced little by little and stated difficulties about the greater matters, e.g. about the phenomena of the moon and those of the sun and the stars, and about the genesis of the universe. And a man who is puzzled and wonders thinks himself ignorant (whence even the lover of myth is in a sense a lover of wisdom, for myth is composed of wonders)...
Folksonomies: pursuit of knowledge
Folksonomies: pursuit of knowledge
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From Aristotle's "Metaphysics". We pursue science not for Utilitarian ends, but for itself.

09 SEP 2011

 Look at the Total Form

If any person thinks the examination of the rest of the animal kingdom an unworthy task, he must hold in like disesteem the study of man. For no one can look at the elements of the human frame—blood, flesh, bones, vessels, and the like—without much repugnance. Moreover, when anyone of the parts or structures, be it which it may, is under discussion, it must not be supposed that it is its material composition to which attention is being directed or which is the object of the discussion, bu...
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Aristotle from "Parts of Animals". Appears to be arguing that the parts of a biological being do not matter, but rather the animal in totality.

09 SEP 2011

 An Ancient Observation of Life from Lifelessness.

Nature proceeds little by little from things lifeless to animal life in such a way that it is impossible to determine the exact line of demarcation, nor on which side thereof an intermediate form should lie. Thus, next after lifeless things comes the plant, and of plants one will differ from another as to its amount of apparent vitality; and, in a word, the whole genus of plants, whilst it is devoid of life as compared with an animal, is endowed with life as compared with other corporeal enti...
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From Aristotle's "History of Animals". From mineral to plant to animal; this could be seen as an early view of evolution.

09 SEP 2011

 An Experiment in Evaporation and Condensation finds Eleme...

Salt water when it turns into vapour becomes sweet, and the vapour does not form salt water when it condenses again. This I know by experiment. The same thing is true in every case of the kind: wine and all fluids that evaporate and condense back into a liquid state become water. They all are water modified by a certain admixture, the nature of which determines their flavour.
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From Aristotle's "Meteorology". An example of knowing something from experiment.

09 SEP 2011

 Ancient Observation of the Changing Landscape

So it is clear, since there will be no end to time and the world is eternal, that neither the Tanais nor the Nile has always been flowing, but that the region whence they flow was once dry; for their action has an end, but time does not. And this will be equally true of all other rivers. But if rivers come into existence and perish and the same parts of the earth were not always moist, the sea must needs change correspondingly. And if the sea is always advancing in one place and receding in a...
Folksonomies: geology time
Folksonomies: geology time
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From Aristotle's "Meteorology". He sees that rivers dry and flow and move.