Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Dewey , John (1929), The Quest for Certainty: A Study of the Relation of Knowledge and Action, Retrieved on 2016-06-15
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  • Folksonomies: science philosophy

    Memes

    15 JUN 2016

     Theoretical Uncertainty has No Meaning

    If one looks at the history of knowledge, it is plain that at the beginning men tried to know because they had to do so in order to live. In the absence of that organic guidance given by their structure to other animals, man had to find out what he was about, and he could find out only by studying the environment which constituted the means, obstacles and results of his behavior. The desire for intellectual or cognitive understanding had no meaning except as a means of obtaining greater secur...
    Folksonomies: philosophy meaning theory
    Folksonomies: philosophy meaning theory
      1  notes
     
    15 JUN 2016

     How Science Resists the Philosophical Concept that Percep...

    In the traditional theory, which still is the prevailing one, there were alleged to exist inherent defects in perception and observation as means of knowledge, in reference to the subjectmatter they furnish. This material, in the older notion, is inherently so particular, so contingent and variable, that by no possible means can it contribute to knowledge; it can result only in opinion, mere belief. But in modern science, there are only practical defects in the senses, certain limitations of ...
    Folksonomies: knowledge perception
    Folksonomies: knowledge perception
      1  notes
     
    15 JUN 2016

     Metaphysical Knowledge is Passive, Science Proactive

    What science actually does is to show that any natural object we please may be treated in terms of relations upon which its occurrence depends, or as an event, and that by so treating it we are enabled to get behind, as it were, the immediate qualities the object of direct experience presents, and to regulate their happening, instead of having to wait for conditions beyond our control to bring it about. Reduction of experienced objects to the form of relations, which are neutral as respects q...
      1  notes
     
    15 JUN 2016

     Greek Philosophical Science of Categorization was Aesthetic

    It is not meant that the Greeks had more respect for the function of perception through the senses than has modern science, but that, judged from present practice, they had altogether too mucfy respect for the material of direct, unanalyzed sense-perception. They were aware of its defects from the standpoint of knowledge. But they supposed that they could correct these defects and supplement their lack by purely logical or "rational" means. They supposed that thought could take the material...
    Folksonomies: knowledge categorization
    Folksonomies: knowledge categorization
      1  notes
     
    15 JUN 2016

     How Scientific Thought Differs from Ancient Thought

    If we consent for the time being to denude the mind of philosophical and metaphysical presuppositions, and take the matter in the most simple and naive way possible, I think our answer, stated in technical terms, will be that [science] substitutes data for objects. (It is not meant that this outcome is the whole effect of the experimental method; that as we saw at the outset is complex; but that the first effect as far as stripping away qualities is concerned is of this nature.) That Greek sc...
      1  notes

    Ancient thought saw things as immutable, to be appreciated aesthetically. Science sees the world as an endless series of mysteries to be solved.