02 MAR 2019 by ideonexus

 Examples of Hyperliterature

17776: What football will look like in the future by Jon Bois — SB Nation A serial piece about space probes in the far future that have gained sentience and are watching humanity play an evolved form of American football. GIFs, animations, and found digital media galore. Adrien Brody by Marie Calloway An account of the author’s romantic relationship with a married journalist, Adrien Brody. Told via emails, texts, and other exchanges. Breathe by Kate Pullinger A ghost story in tap for...
Folksonomies: new media hyperliterature
Folksonomies: new media hyperliterature
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13 DEC 2017 by ideonexus

 Why We Can't Have "Intuitive" Programming Languages

If a procedure named INSIGHT has been defined and then called seventeen times in the program, and the eighteenth time it is misspelled as INSIHGT, woe to the programmer. The compiler will balk and print a rigidly unsympathetic error message, saying that it has never heard of INSIHGT. Often, when such an error is detected by a compiler, the compiler tries to continue, but because of its lack of insihgt, it has not understood what the programmer meant. In fact, it may very well suppose that som...
Folksonomies: programming intuition
Folksonomies: programming intuition
  1  notes
 
29 SEP 2017 by ideonexus

 We Compile What We Read in the Context of When We Read It

Reading and experience train your model of the world. And even if you forget the experience or what you read, its effect on your model of the world persists. Your mind is like a compiled program you've lost the source of. It works, but you don't know why. [...] ...reading and experience are usually "compiled" at the time they happen, using the state of your brain at that time. The same book would get compiled differently at different points in your life. Which means it is very much worth re...
Folksonomies: worldview memory reading
Folksonomies: worldview memory reading
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27 DEC 2016 by ideonexus

 Digital Content and the Common Core

Common Core Standard 7 says students should be able to "integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words." Anchor Standard 6 in writing says students should "use technology, including the internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others." And Anchor Standard 8 says students should "gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and ...
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21 APR 2011 by ideonexus

 Bernie Cosell on the Complexity of Modern Programming

So I don't envy modern programmers, and It's going to get worse. The simple things are getting packaged into libraries, leaving only the hard things. That stuff is getting so complicated, but the standards that people are expecting are stunning. One of the ones ^i^ey showed me stunned me. He was showing me Google Maps that will do I routes for you. One of the things you can Jo is you can grab a piece of the route with ^our mouse and drag that piece of the route somewhere else to tell Google t...
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Provides a great example of complexity in Google Maps functionality and being thankful that he no longer must contend with such increasing difficulty.

21 APR 2011 by ideonexus

 Ken Thompson on Obfuscation in Modern Code

Suppose someone describing something to me from postulates like. "Here's a computer and here are the op codes." I can visualize the structure of programs and how things are efficient or inefficient based on those op codes, by seeing the bottom and imagining the hierarchy. And i can see the same thing with programs. If someone shows me library routines or basic bottom-level things, I can see how you can build that into different programs and what's missing—the kinds of programs that would st...
  1  notes

Modern programming principles involve a great deal of delegation, resulting in code that is very hard to follow.