Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Forster, E.M. (1909), The Machine Stops, Retrieved on 2017-01-09
  • Source Material [archive.ncsa.illinois.edu]
  • Folksonomies: science fiction

    Memes

    09 JAN 2017

     The Machine

    Vashanti"s next move was to turn off the isolation switch, and all the accumulations of the last three minutes burst upon her. The room was filled with the noise of bells, and speaking-tubes. What was the new food like? Could she recommend it? Has she had any ideas lately? Might one tell her one"s own ideas? Would she make an engagement to visit the public nurseries at an early date? - say this day month. To most of these questions she replied with irritation - a growing quality in that acce...
      1  notes

    A world where everyone lives in isolated rooms underground and communicates through social networking tools. Very prescient for 1909.

    09 JAN 2017

     Cultural Homogenization Makes Travel Pointless

    But she thought of Kuno as a baby, his birth, his removal to the public nurseries, her own visit to him there, his visits to her-visits which stopped when the Machine had assigned him a room on the other side of the earth. "Parents, duties of," said the book of the Machine," cease at the moment of birth. P.422327483." True, but there was something special about Kuno - indeed there had been something special about all her children - and, after all, she must brave the journey if he desired it. ...
    Folksonomies: culture futurism diversity
    Folksonomies: culture futurism diversity
      1  notes
     
    09 JAN 2017

     The Machine Euthanizes the Atheletic

    "Well, the Book"s wrong, for I have been out on my feet." For Kuno was possessed of a certain physical strength. By these days it was a demerit to be muscular. Each infant was examined at birth, and all who promised undue strength were destroyed. Humanitarians may protest, but it would have been no true kindness to let an athlete live; he would never have been happy in that state of life to which the Machine had called him; he would have yearned for trees to climb, rivers to bathe in, meado...
    Folksonomies: distopia
    Folksonomies: distopia
      1  notes
     
    09 JAN 2017

     Distopian View Praising Second-Hand Knowledge

    The first of these was the abolition of respirator. Advanced thinkers, like Vashti, had always held it foolish to visit the surface of the earth. Air-ships might be necessary, but what was the good of going out for mere curiosity and crawling along for a mile or two in a terrestrial motor? The habit was vulgar and perhaps faintly improper: it was unproductive of ideas, and had no connection with the habits that really mattered. So respirators were abolished, and with them, of course, the ter...
      1  notes