Math Games

Games that teach math, quantification, comparisons, etc.


Folksonomies: education math

Memes

02 SEP 2016

 Math Exercise: Multiple Approaches to Problem-Solving

For example, if the problem was to fi nd the answer to 8 × 6, students may suggest three options: memorizing the multiplication table for 6, knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and adding another 8 to equal 48, or adding a column of six 8s. Allowing students to personally choose among approaches all confi rmed as correct and to support their choice will increase their comfort levels. Th is process also builds math logic, intuition, and reasoning skills that extend into other academic subjects and real-...
Folksonomies: education games math exercises
Folksonomies: education games math exercises
  1  notes
 
02 SEP 2016

 "This Is Not a..." Game

A game called “Th is Is Not a...” encourages multiple solutions and is played in a relaxed environment that encourages creativity. Students pass around an object—such as a toy telephone—and say, “This is not a....” Younger students name an object that is not a toy telephone (for example, “This is not a pencil.”). Older students continue and say, “This is not a toy telephone, it is a...,” and they gesture or mime to suggest the object that they are pretending the toy teleph...
Folksonomies: education games
Folksonomies: education games
  1  notes
 
02 SEP 2016

 Teaching Temperature

Outside Temperatures. Place a thermometer outside a window so students can make daily calculations and keep a chart reporting the actual temperature and the temperature change from the previous day. Students will see that the change can be a negative number without the temperature falling below 0—an often-confusing concept that is clarified by these observations. An achievable-challenge extension could include barometers, and students who need more advanced work can learn how negative—or...
  1  notes
 
02 SEP 2016

 Math Games

Buzz. An example of a low-stress, win-win game is Prime Number Buzz. Students stand in a circle or at their desks and go around the room in order, saying either the next sequential number if it is a composite or “buzz” if it is a prime. If they are incorrect, they sit down, but they keep listening and when they catch another student’s error, they stand up and rejoin the game. (The same game format works for Multiples Buzz, using multiples of, for example, 3, 4, and so on.) Telephone. T...
Folksonomies: education games math
Folksonomies: education games math
  1  notes
 
02 SEP 2016

 Math Exercise: Comparisons

Select two boxes or cans of food that weigh 8 ounces and 16 ounces, respectively. Have students hold each as you tell them (or they read) the weights of the containers. Give students a box or can with the weight covered and have them compare the weight of the new package to the weight of the 8- and 16-ounce samples. Th ey can then estimate whether the new item’s weight is closer to 8 or 16 ounces. As students become more successful, they may want to predict a more specifi c weight. Ask them...
Folksonomies: education games math
Folksonomies: education games math
  1  notes
 


References

02 SEP 2016

 Learning to Love Math

Books, Brochures, and Chapters>Book:  Willis, Judy (2010), Learning to Love Math, ASCD, Alexandria, VA, Retrieved on 2016-09-02
Folksonomies: education games math
Folksonomies: education games math
 13