18 MAY 2017 by ideonexus

 Habituation and Novelty

Beginning in infancy and throughout the life span, humans are motivated by newness, change, and excitement. Habituation, the tendency to lose interest in a repeated event and gain interest in a new one, is one of the most fundamental human reflexes. If the thermostat were to suddenly turn the air conditioning on, you would hear the loud humming sound begin, but within minutes you couldn’t even hear it if you tried. Habituation, a fundamental property of the nervous system, provides mechanis...
Folksonomies: education learning novelty
Folksonomies: education learning novelty
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Longest Ever Personality Study Finds No Correlation Betwe...

There is evidence for differential stability in personality trait differences, even over decades. The authors used data from a sample of the Scottish Mental Survey, 1947 to study personality stability from childhood to older age. The 6-Day Sample (N = 1,208) were rated on six personality characteristics by their teachers at around age 14. In 2012, the authors traced as many of these participants as possible and invited them to take part in a follow-up study. Those who agreed (N = 174) complet...
Folksonomies: psychology personality
Folksonomies: psychology personality
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Suggests that we are not the same person as adults as we were as a youth in any way.

09 JAN 2017 by ideonexus

 The Machine Euthanizes the Atheletic

"Well, the Book"s wrong, for I have been out on my feet." For Kuno was possessed of a certain physical strength. By these days it was a demerit to be muscular. Each infant was examined at birth, and all who promised undue strength were destroyed. Humanitarians may protest, but it would have been no true kindness to let an athlete live; he would never have been happy in that state of life to which the Machine had called him; he would have yearned for trees to climb, rivers to bathe in, meado...
Folksonomies: distopia
Folksonomies: distopia
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01 JAN 2017 by ideonexus

 The Twelve Life Areas

Values & Purpose Your deeper, underlying, fundamental values and wants. Your philosophy of life. Your sense of purpose, vision, and meaning. Do I have a sense of purpose and direction in life? What do I want out of life? How do I want the world to be different? What is my philosophy of life? What are my fundamental values? What do I truly value? Contribution & Impact How you give value to the world, make a difference, and have a positive impact. How am I giving value to the worl...
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29 NOV 2016 by ideonexus

 The Destiny of Earthseed

The Destiny of EarthseedIs to take root among the stars.It is to live and to thriveOn new earths.It is to become new beingsAnd to consider new questions.It is to leap into the heavensAgain and again.It is to explore the vastnessOf heaven.It is to explore the vastnessOf ourselves.   We are Earthseed.We are flesh—self aware, questing, problem-solving flesh.We are that aspect of Earthlife best able to shape God knowingly.We are Earthlife maturing,Earthlife preparing to fall away from the pare...
Folksonomies: religion change destiny
Folksonomies: religion change destiny
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Abuse of Science in Politics

North Carolina provides a recent example of science-based policy. The science itself was a study of voting habits among the population of the state. In 2013, North Carolina passed new voting restrictions. To inform those restrictions, the legislature commissioned a study on voting habits by race, and then wrote into law a series of restrictions that specifically targeted African Americans. (Last month, a Federal Court struck down these restrictions, claiming that “the new provisions target ...
Folksonomies: politics science
Folksonomies: politics science
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08 JUL 2016 by ideonexus

 Age-Related Decline in Strength as Decline Neurons

“What we have here is (a) failure to communicate,” said the Captain in the 1967 film Cool Hand Luke. This line rings true today as it relates to the failure of physiologists to communicate the mechanisms of muscle strength to the geriatrics community, where the lack of muscle strength observed in older adults holds high clinical significance. Similarly, there is a relative under recognition in the scientific community for the potential role of the brain’s failure to communicate with ske...
Folksonomies: cognition aging strength
Folksonomies: cognition aging strength
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As the neurons controlling muscle fibers die off, those muscles grow weaker. Possibly exercising muscles might keep signals going to those neurons and keep them alive, staving off age-related cognitive decline.

30 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 The Unnecessariat

In 2011, economist Guy Standing coined the term “precariat” to refer to workers whose jobs were insecure, underpaid, and mobile, who had to engage in substantial “work for labor” to remain employed, whose survival could, at any time, be compromised by employers (who, for instance held their visas) and who therefore could do nothing to improve their lot. The term found favor in the Occupy movement, and was colloquially expanded to include not just farmworkers, contract workers, “gig...
Folksonomies: poverty demographics
Folksonomies: poverty demographics
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30 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Rural Communities "Deserve to Die"

It is immoral because it perpetuates a lie: that the white working class that finds itself attracted to Trump has been victimized by outside forces... [N]obody did this to them. They failed themselves. [...] If you spend time in hardscrabble, white upstate New York, or eastern Kentucky, or my own native West Texas, and you take an honest look at the welfare dependency, the drug and alcohol addiction, the family anarchy—which is to say, the whelping of human children with all the respect a...
Folksonomies: politics
Folksonomies: politics
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Commentary from a conservative lamenting the rise of Donald Trump

24 NOV 2015 by ideonexus

 How to Improve Self-Control in Schools

Make school more demanding for all students In its coverage of U.S. secondary education, the popular press tends to focus on two relatively small groups: students headed for elite colleges (many of whom are under tremendous stress and pressure) and students at risk for dropping out (many of whom come from the most disadvantaged communities). These stories are important to tell, but they leave out the vast majority of students, who don't fall into either of these extremes. These high school st...
Folksonomies: self control
Folksonomies: self control
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