20 JUL 2017 by ideonexus

 How the fantastic becomes dull and familiar

Most fantasy RPGs follow the tried and allegedly true formula, which strips them of anything ‘fantastic’ and grounds them in the dull ‘reality’ of the familiar. Sadly, the much coveted instant recognition usually means instantly forgettable. How many times should we save an utterly predictable and generic world before it gets really old? Why is that when we see a town on the horizon, it’s not a place of wonder and strange customs, but a place to restock on FEDEX quest and trade in y...
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17 NOV 2014 by ideonexus

 An Eloquent Description of Science and Wonder

As I gathered information for this book, I was continually reminded of the reality that science, rooted as it is in the certainties of the physical world, is a process that necessarily unfolds over time. In school, science classes tend to work according to this linear model; there's a “beginning, middle, and end” to science investigations, no matter how hard teachers may fight the “cookbook” reductionism that threatens true scientific inquiry. Yet, in probing further, I came to unders...
Folksonomies: science education wonder
Folksonomies: science education wonder
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21 APR 2014 by ideonexus

 Cool Science Facts

"There are a million points of light in the universe traveling a million miles an hour away from us, yet they are so far away they appear to be standing still." "Estimate for # of planets in visible universe: 10^25, which = # molecules in a cup of water" Robert Garisto, PRL "I'm is Juliet Retenford and my favorite science fact is that marmoset siblings are all genetic chimeras of each other because they all share a single placenta so a single circulation." "Hi Dr. Jim Macena, University o...
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What happens when you ask scientists what their favorite science fact is.

30 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Everything is for You

Do you have doubts about life? Are you unsure if it is worth the trouble? Look at the sky: that is for you. Look at each person’s face as you pass on the street: those faces are for you. And the street itself, and the ground under the street, and the ball of fire underneath the ground: all these things are for you. They are as much for you as they are for other people. Remember this when you wake up in the morning and think you have nothing. Stand up and face the east. Now praise the sky an...
Folksonomies: wonder meaning life purpose
Folksonomies: wonder meaning life purpose
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A nice thought for when you think you have nothing.

30 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Science Can Never Weary the Mind

Unlike religion, Science can never weary the mind: the dreary monotony of the former is a perfect contrast to the life-inspiring power of the latter. Every step you take in Science, stimulates you to further pursuit. The vast volume of nature, that book of books, that only revelation worthy the attention of man, is always open to the Man of Science; and in this book the child can find a language that shall be intelligible, and adapted to his youthful capacity. He can read here without stupify...
Folksonomies: science wonder awe
Folksonomies: science wonder awe
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The sense of wonder and awe can only lead to the pursuit of more wonder and awe.

19 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Understanding Awe

It can be hard to generalize what people consider jaw-dropping, but Vohs says research demonstrates what consistently creates an awesome experience. Travel ranks high. So does gazing at the cosmos on a clear night or watching a sensational film, as well as anytime we encounter massive quantities: colorful tulips in bloom, a bustling market in India, or a stunning school of fish. Novelty and perceptual vastness forces us into the present moment. The study underscores the importance of cultiva...
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The sense of wonder has health benefits, may open us up to learning new information, but what is it exactly?

23 JUN 2013 by ideonexus

 An Elegant Complex Description of Fire

The atoms like each other to different degrees. Oxygen, for instance in the air, would like to be next to carbon, and if they get near to each other, they snap together. If they’re not too close though, they repel and they go apart, so they don’t know that they could snap together. It’s just as if you had a ball, it was trying to climb a hill and there was a hole it could go into, like a volcano hole, a deep one. It’s rolling along, it doesn’t go down in the deep hole, because if it...
Folksonomies: nature wonder explanations
Folksonomies: nature wonder explanations
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From Richard Feynman, making the process of burning wood seem wondrous.

08 JAN 2013 by ideonexus

 Infinite Creativity was Stored in Hydrogen Atoms

Once the matter created by the Big Bang cooled sufficiently, the universe consisted of a vast cloud of hydrogen atom consisting of a single proton surrounded by a single electron—along with a smattering of slightly heavier elements, including helium (with two protons) and lithium (with three). The universe at that time was about the most boring place imaginable. It consisted of nothing but disembodied atoms drifting through space and the radiation left over from the Big Bang. Yet the potent...
Folksonomies: wonder simplicity big bang
Folksonomies: wonder simplicity big bang
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From this simple unit, everything in the Universe came about.

06 JUL 2012 by ideonexus

 The Bootes Void

In the course of a redshift survey of galaxies brighter than R approximately equal to 16.3, 133 redshifts were measured in three fields, each separated by roughly 35 deg from the other two. If the galaxies in these fields were distributed uniformly, the combination of a galaxian luminosity function and the magnitude limits predicts that the distribution of redshifts should peak near 15,000 km/s. In fact, only one galaxy of the 133 was observed with a redshift in the 6000 km/s interval centere...
Folksonomies: wonder astronomy
Folksonomies: wonder astronomy
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An inconceivably massive region of space extremely sparsely populated with galaxies, strangely spherical in shape.

22 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 The Fairest Thing We Can Experience is the Mysterious

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true science. He who knows it not, and can no longer wonder, no longer feel amazement, is as good as dead. We all had this priceless talent when we were young. But as time goes by, many of us lose it. The true scientist never loses the faculty of amazement. It is the essence of his being.
Folksonomies: wonder mystery
Folksonomies: wonder mystery
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The inability to experience it makes one dead inside.