31 MAY 2015 by ideonexus

 Perception of Time

“Do not squander time,” said Benjamin Franklin, “for that is the stuff life is made of.” Our consciousness, even more than it is posted in space, unrolls in time. I can imagine abolishing space from my awareness—if, say, I were floating in a sensory deprivation tank or became blind and paralyzed—while still continuing to think as usual. But it’s almost impossible to imagine abolishing time from one’s awareness, leaving the last thought immobilized like a stuck car horn, while ...
Folksonomies: perception time
Folksonomies: perception time
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30 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 Your Birth Star

Name any event in history and you will find a star out there whose light gives you a glimpse of something happening during the year of that event. Provided you are not a very young child, somewhere up in the night sky you can find your personal birth star. Its light is a thermonuclear glow that heralds the year of your birth. Indeed, you can find quite a few such stars (about 40 if you are 40; about 70 if you are 50; about 175 if you are 80 years old). When you look at one of your birth year ...
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29 OCT 2014 by ideonexus

 Who shall declare the time allotted to the human race

Who shall declare the time allotted to the human race, when the generations of the most insignificant insect also existed for unnumbered ages? Yet man is also to vanish in the ever-changing course of events. The earth is to be burnt up, and the elements are to melt with fervent heat—to be again reduced to chaos—possibly to be renovated and adorned for other races of beings. These stupendous changes may be but cycles in those great laws of the universe, where all is variable but the laws t...
Folksonomies: time perspective
Folksonomies: time perspective
  1  notes
 
19 JUL 2014 by ideonexus

 The Decline in Reading is Because of Limited Time

With e-books becoming more dominant and less money coming into the industry, the bookstores die (they're already highly marginal now). With bookstores' death, so go the publishers (after all, any established author will make more money from self-publishing and now the *one* (incredibly important) thing the publishers offer - shelf space - is gone). With publishers gone, we all essentially become slush pile readers. The books are nearly free, but the constraint is *time*, not money, and with ...
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Not money, time is a limited resource.

21 JUN 2014 by ideonexus

 800 Lifespans Bridge 50,000 Years

Eight hundred life spans can bridge more than 50,000 years. But of these 800 people, 650 spent then lives in caves or worse; only the last 70 had any truly effective means of communicating with one another, only the last 6 ever saw a printed word or had any real means of measuring heat or cold, only the last 4 could measure time with any precision; only the last 2 used an electric motor; and the vast majority of the items that make up our material world were developed within the lifespan of t...
Folksonomies: history time perspective
Folksonomies: history time perspective
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24 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 A Second is Subjective

How many seconds are there in a lifetime? 10^9 sec A second is an arbitrary time unit, but one that is based on our experience. Our visual system is bombarded by snapshots at a rate of around three per second, caused by rapid eye movements called saccades. Athletes often win or lose a race by a fraction of a second. If you earned a dollar for every second in your life, you would be a billionaire. However, a second can feel like a minute in front of an audience, and a quiet weekend can disap...
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Terrence Sejnowski on how a moment of time is a subjective experience that grows longer the more novelty is packed into it.

02 JUL 2013 by ideonexus

 The Oddball Effect

The more detailed the memory, the longer the moment seems to last. “This explains why we think that time speeds up when we grow older,” Eagleman said—why childhood summers seem to go on forever, while old age slips by while we’re dozing. The more familiar the world becomes, the less information your brain writes down, and the more quickly time seems to pass. “Time is this rubbery thing,” Eagleman said. “It stretches out when you really turn your brain resources on, and when you...
Folksonomies: perception time
Folksonomies: perception time
  1  notes

Novel experiences make slows down our perception of time.

02 JUL 2013 by ideonexus

 Five Ways to Stretch Your Perception of Time

1. Keep learning Learning new things is a pretty obvious way to pass your brain new information on a regular basis. If you’re constantly reading, trying new activities or taking courses to learn new skills, you’ll have a wealth of ‘newness’ at your fingertips to help you slow down time. 2. Visit new places A new environment can send a mass of information rushing to your brain—smells, sounds, people, colors, textures. Your brain has to interpret all of this. Exposing your brain to...
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Keep Learning, Visit New Places, Meet New People, Try New Activities, Be Spontaneous

03 MAY 2013 by ideonexus

 keyframe

n. a moment that seemed innocuous at the time but ended up marking a diversion into a strange new era of your life—set in motion not by a series of jolting epiphanies but by tiny imperceptible differences between one ordinary day and the next, until entire years of your memory can be compressed into a handful of indelible images—which prevents you from rewinding the past, but allows you to move forward without endless buffering.
Folksonomies: meaning perception time
Folksonomies: meaning perception time
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A moment that marks a transition in our lives, but really serves as a signifier for a long gradual change.

21 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Conception of Time

We never really see time. We see only clocks. If you say this object moves, what you really mean is that this object is here when the hand of your clock is here, and so on. We say we measure time with clocks, but we see only the hands of the clocks, not time itself. And the hands of a clock are a physical variable like any other. So in a sense we cheat because what we really observe are physical variables as a function of other physical variables, but we represent that as if everything is evo...
Folksonomies: time
Folksonomies: time
  1  notes

We do not see time, we only see its effects.