30 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Co-veillance

At first sight, things seem quite similar in City Number Two. Again, there are ubiquitous cameras, perched on every vantage point. Only here we soon find a crucial difference. The devices do not report to the secret police. Rather, each and every citizen of this metropolis can lift his or her wristwatch/TV and call up images from any camera in town. Here, a late-evening stroller checks to make sure no one lurks beyond the corner she is about to turn. Over there, a tardy young man dials to s...
Folksonomies: surveillance panopticon
Folksonomies: surveillance panopticon
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16 JUL 2013 by ideonexus

 Covering Your Tracks Online is Suspicious

The drawback to covering your tracks like this on a daily basis is that it sometimes makes you look like, well, like you’re covering your tracks. People who engage all of their privacy functions sometimes stand out in a transparent society. It may make people suspicious, thinking that you’re up to something. If you’re only encrypting your communications with certain people, it sometimes makes it look even worse, like you’re collaborating—and it also pinpoints who you’re in cahoots...
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If you do not show up in searches, then it appears as though you have something to hide.

16 JUL 2013 by ideonexus

 Seeding Untruths as an Act of Rebellion

Conceding that the battle to stop documentation of people’s private details and lives was a lost one, the Decepticons have taken a different approach: make this data unreliable. Decepticon hackers work hard to penetrate mesh databases and seed false information. They have released numerous worms and trojans into the wild with the sole purposes of gaining access to archives, selecting random entries, and replacing the data with autogenerated material (similar enough to pass, but false). Some...
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As a protest against sousiveillance, some hackers turn to filling the Web with false data to make all data unreliable.

16 JUL 2013 by ideonexus

 Constant Surveillance Builds a Better Identity

There are some who argue that individuality suffers under universal surveillance. When everything about you is known, and you have little or no control over how your identity is presented to others, you become just another person in a mass of similar persons. With no way to define yourself, individuality is eroded. We all become everyman and everywoman, or so the argument goes. To the contrary, the amount of detail provided to everyone around us in a transparent society helps to show all of t...
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If people know a great deal about you with a simple web search before they meet you, social interactions are smoother.

16 JUL 2013 by ideonexus

 Accountability in the Surveillance State

Where power intervenes, transparency fails to provide accountability. This is the main fact that the residents of the Planetary Consortium and their ilk must grasp. Public-accessible cameras and citizen sousveillance of police is not enough. To truly hold the people at the top accountable, publicams should be placed inside police stations, interrogation rooms, jails, security checkpoints, congressional chambers, and anywhere government officials meet with lobbyists, make decisions, and otherw...
Folksonomies: technology surveillance
Folksonomies: technology surveillance
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Cameras must be everywhere, in politician's offices, interrogation rooms, everyone must watch everyone.

16 JUL 2013 by ideonexus

 Sleepwalking into the Surveillance State

The historians say that we sleepwalked into a surveillance state. They meant that the technology for widespread surveillance progressed and was implemented in a gradual manner, though quick considering the actual time scales, and with little in the way of open discussion about the ramifications, so that before anyone thought to object it was already ingrained into society. When the tables turned and the same technology was used to watch the watchers, there was a bit more resistance, but by th...
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Exerpt from a futurist vision.

17 JUN 2013 by ideonexus

 The Strategy of Releasing All Data

The response many organizations adopted then (and continue to pursue AF) is to provide overwhelming amounts of data to the public. This provided a two-fold defense. First, it allowed immediate deniability to any charge of withholding data. Second, the sheer volume of data available meant that almost any argument could be made or refuted with selective referencing and correlation to other publicly available information. This is a rapid, cheap response that puts the onus back on the accuser to ...
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Interesting idea: be completely transparent, releasing so much data that any hypothesis can be cherry-picked from it, then hire spin-doctors to do just that.