20 MAR 2018 by ideonexus

 Human Females Menstruate to Eliminate Unviable Fetuses

From a female perspective, pregnancy is always a huge investment. Even more so if her species has a hemochorial placenta. Once that placenta is in place, she not only loses full control of her own hormones, she also risks hemorrhage when it comes out. So it makes sense that females want to screen embryos very, very carefully. Going through pregnancy with a weak, inviable or even sub-par fetus isn't worth it. That's where the endometrium comes in. You've probably read about how the endometriu...
Folksonomies: human evolution pregnancy
Folksonomies: human evolution pregnancy
  1  notes
 
20 MAR 2018 by ideonexus

 Human Pregnancy is Adversarial Between Mother and Fetus

Inside the uterus we have a thick layer of endometrial tissue, which contains only tiny blood vessels. The endometrium seals off our main blood supply from the newly implanted embryo. The growing placenta literally burrows through this layer, rips into arterial walls and re-wires them to channel blood straight to the hungry embryo. It delves deep into the surrounding tissues, razes them and pumps the arteries full of hormones so they expand into the space created. It paralyzes these arteries ...
Folksonomies: human evolution pregnancy
Folksonomies: human evolution pregnancy
  1  notes
 
12 JUL 2016 by ideonexus

 Correlation Between Perception of Birth and Maternal Infa...

As reported previously, the strongest influence on maternal infant bonding (MFA) in the regression analysis was a woman‘s perception of her birth experience (POBS) as revealed by an R-squared of 0.055, p < 0.01, which represents 5.5% of the proportion of variation in maternal infant bonding. Furthermore, the correlation analysis between POBS and MFA demonstrated a correlation of 0.234, p< 0.01. In addition, a notable finding was the POBS mean of 107.07 and SD of 18.92, which is a mode...
Folksonomies: parenting pregnancy birth
Folksonomies: parenting pregnancy birth
  1  notes
 
09 AUG 2014 by ideonexus

 The Mother's Womb Tests the Viability of the Fetus

Given the invasive nature of pregnancy, it’s perhaps not surprising that the primate womb has evolved to be wary of committing to it. Mammals whose placentae don’t breach the walls of the womb can simply abort or reabsorb unwanted foetuses at any stage of pregnancy. For primates, any such manoeuvre runs the risk of haemorrhage, as the placenta rips away from the mother’s enlarged and paralysed arterial system. And that, in a sentence, is why miscarriages are so dangerous. It’s also w...
Folksonomies: pregnancy biology
Folksonomies: pregnancy biology
  1  notes
 
09 AUG 2014 by ideonexus

 Invasive Blood-Seeking Fetuses in Mammals

In most mammals, the mother’s blood supply remains safely isolated from the foetus. It passes its nutrients to the foetus through a filter, which the mother controls. The mother is a despot: she provides only what she chooses, which makes her largely invulnerable to paternal manipulation during pregnancy. In primates and mice, it’s a different story. Cells from the invading placenta digest their way through the endometrial surface, puncturing the mother’s arteries, swarming inside and ...
Folksonomies: evolution pregnancy
Folksonomies: evolution pregnancy
  1  notes
 
28 JUL 2011 by ideonexus

 Benefits of Exercise for Pregnancy

Does that mean exercise should be a part of human pregnancies? Evidence suggests the answer is yes. The first benefit is a practical one, having to do with labor. Many women report that giving birth is both the most exhilarating experience of their lives and the most painful. But women who exercise regularly have a much easier time giving birth than obese women. For fit women, the second stage of labor—that painful phase where you have to do a lot of pushing—lasts an average of 27 minutes...
Folksonomies: pregnancy exercise
Folksonomies: pregnancy exercise
  1  notes

Women who are fit have a shorter second stage labor compared to women who are obese, resulting in less stress and oxygen deprivation for the infant.

28 JUL 2011 by ideonexus

 Three Characteristics of Stress to Avoid in Pregnancy

Researchers have isolated three toxic types. Their common characteristic: that you feel out of control over the bad stuff coming at you. As stress moves from moderate to severe, and from acute to chronic, this loss of control turns catastrophic and begins to affect baby. Here are the bad types of stress: • Too frequent. Chronic, unrelenting stress during pregnancy hurts baby brain development. The stress doesn’t necessarily have to be severe. The poison is sustained, long-term exposu...
  1  notes

Frequency, severity, and individual temperaments determine how much stress a person can experience while pregnant and have it affect the health of their baby.

27 JUL 2011 by ideonexus

 Why the Brain Takes So Much Time and Effort

The brain’s chief job description—yours, mine, and your hopelessly adorable children’s—is to help our bodies survive another day. The reason for survival is as old as Darwin and as young as sexting: so we can project our genes into the next generation. Will a human willingly overcome self-interest to ensure the survival of his or her family’s genes into the next generation? Apparently, yes. Enough of us did hundreds of thousands of years ago that we grew up to take over the Seren...
  1  notes

Babies must be born before they are ready to prevent killing the mother, thus parenting became an evolutionary strategy in humans.

27 JUL 2011 by ideonexus

 Morning Sickness as an Evolutionary Strategy

In fact, some evolutionary biologists believe this is why morning sickness still persists in human pregnancies. Morning sickness, which can last the entire day (and, for some women, the entire pregnancy), makes a woman stick to a bland, boring diet—if she eats much at all. This avoidance strategy would have kept our maternal ancestors away from the natural toxins in exotic or spoiled foods in the wild, unregulated menu of the Pleistocene diet. The accompanying fatigue would keep women from ...
  1  notes

The nausea encourages women to pursue a bland diet.

20 JUL 2011 by ideonexus

 The Importance of Tactile Experience in Infants

Nonetheless, our early touch experiences determine the extent of possible tactile sensitivity. They also play a surprisingly potent role in the overall quality of brain development. We have already seen in Chapter 2 how rats raised in a highly enriched environment develop a thicker cerebral cortex and are actually cleverer than rats raised in a standard laboratory environment. A good share of this enriching experience involves tactile sensation. When young rats are provided with new toys, the...
  1  notes

Rats provided with a variety of constantly changed toys to play with and those touched by their mothers have larger brains and are more cognitively prepared for the world.