02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Maintain Positive Memories and Knowledge

Other ways to celebrate and maintain positive memories and knowledge include the following: Have students teach the new skill to someone else. Have students keep a list of achievements in their math journals or write them on a wall chart. Take a photo of the fi nal achievement (even if it is something as simple as a well-solved math problem). Have students compose a note to their parents, and add your own comments. Provide opportunities for students to transfer the new skills to new situatio...
Folksonomies: education knowledge memory
Folksonomies: education knowledge memory
  1  notes
 
03 NOV 2015 by ideonexus

 The Myth of the Brain as a Video Camera

Before we discuss what current research tells us about memory and recall, it may be helpful to address a common misconception that emerged from the work ofCanadian neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield in the 1930s and 1940s. Penfield reported that during surgery, an electrical stimulation of the temporal lobe produced episodes of recall, almost like seeing movie clips. Many concluded that the brain ―videotaped‖ life, and to remember things, our memories simply needed to be prompted. But these epi...
Folksonomies: cognition memory
Folksonomies: cognition memory
  1  notes
 
24 JAN 2015 by ideonexus

 Technology is Preserving Our Ghosts

Our technology is giving us progressively greater power to keep alive our ancestors' ghosts. First the invention of writing allowed us to preserve their words. Painting and photography allowed us to preserve their faces. The phonograph preserves their voices and the videotape recorder preserves their movement and gestures. But this is only the beginning. Soon we shall acquire the technology to preserve a permanent record of the sequence of bases in the DNA of their cells. This means that we s...
  1  notes
 
31 JUL 2014 by ideonexus

 Memory Systems as a Shared Resource

This inspired them to depart from testing memory for lists of words and events, and to explore the amount of rich, in-depth information remembered by couples about experienced events. They found these social exchanges led to clear collaborative memory benefits, which could take three forms: “New information” such as finally snatching an elusive name of a musical thanks to a chain of prompts between the two parties. Richer, more vivid descriptions of events including sensory information. ...
Folksonomies: cognition memory networking
Folksonomies: cognition memory networking
 1  1  notes
 
31 JUL 2014 by ideonexus

 Couples as Socially-Distributed Cognitive Systems

In everyday life remembering occurs within social contexts, and theories from a number of disciplines predict cognitive and social benefits of shared remembering. Recent debates have revolved around the possibility that cognition can be distributed across individuals and material resources, as well as across groups of individuals. We review evidence from a maturing program of empirical research in which we adopted the lens of distributed cognition to gain new insights into the ways that remem...
 1  1  notes
 
29 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Glucose and Oxygent Improve Memory Formation

Increasing glucose and oxygen supplies to the brain seems to allow iniformation to be committed more accurately and fully to memory; in other words, you learn better. This means when you come to recall it at a later stage, you will undoubtedly do better, because the information there is clearer and more comprehensive. The reverse does not seem to be true, however. If you first encoded something without the aid of extra oxygen and glucose, suddenly making more oxygen and glucose available when...
Folksonomies: cognition memory health
Folksonomies: cognition memory health
  1  notes

Not memory retrieval, but well-timed breathing exercises and soda can improve the retention of learning.

24 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Human Memory, Computer Memory

Almost all of those limits start with a peculiar fact about human memory: Although we are pretty good at storing information in our brains, we are pretty poor at retrieving it. We can recognize photos from our high school yearbooks decades later, yet find it impossible to remember what we had for breakfast yesterday. Faulty memories have been known to lead to erroneous eyewitness testimony (and false imprisonment), to marital friction (in the form of overlooked anniversaries), and even death ...
Folksonomies: memory human condition
Folksonomies: memory human condition
  1  notes

Gary Marcus describes how human memory is haphazard, context-specific. We can't retrieve a specific detail easily, but we can if we are in the right context to trigger its retrieval.

30 JUN 2013 by ideonexus

 Digital Archiving Creates an Immense Wealth of History

With digital archiving in all its forms, however, a new regime of technologies for holding past experience has emerged. Our past has always been malleable, but now it is malleable with a new viscosity. Whereas in the past our experiences were frequently (literally!) pigeonholed into rigid classification systems, leading to a relative paucity of tales we could tell of our past, today the traces have multiplied and the rigid classifications are withering. (Who now does a “tree” search using...
  1  notes

We once had to document history, but now our lives are documented for us all over the place online.

30 JUN 2013 by ideonexus

 Our Collective Memory

Taken globally, the set of traces that we leave in the world does without doubt add up to something. It is through operations on sets of traces that I understand an event that I take part in. Tolstoy wrote about the foot soldier in the Napoleonic wars. The soldier he describes cannot have the experience of the war he is waging nor the battle he is fighting because the only “global” traces of the war are inscriptions—notably, maps and statistics. There is no scalable observation that mov...
  1  notes

No one soldier experiences a War. They experience details from their microcosm encounter with the war. The war itself is a collective memory experienced only in history books.

03 MAY 2013 by ideonexus

 énouement

n. the bittersweetness of having arrived here in the future, where you can finally get the answers to how things turn out in the real world—who your baby sister would become, what your friends would end up doing, where your choices would lead you, exactly when you’d lose the people you took for granted—which is priceless intel that you instinctively want to share with anybody who hadn’t already made the journey, as if there was some part of you who had volunteered to stay behind, who ...
Folksonomies: memory perception nostalgia
Folksonomies: memory perception nostalgia
  1  notes

A poetic way to describe the desire to know in the past what we know now.