30 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Defining Spirituality

There have been numerous proposed definitions of spirituality over the years each reflecting an influence of the culture and religion at that point in time ((Vaillot 1970; Colliton, 1981; Amenta, 1986; Stoll, 1989; Reed, 1992; Narayanasamy, 1999; Tanyi, 2002; Tuck, 2004; Burkhardt & Jacobson, 2005; Dossey & Guzzeta, 2005). Many individuals have used the terms religion and spirituality interchangeably but there is a perceived difference between the two. The essence of religion is found...
Folksonomies: spirituality medicine
Folksonomies: spirituality medicine
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14 MAR 2016 by ideonexus

 One in 1,000 to 500 Chance of Cancer from Childhood CT Scan

The first study to assess directly the risk of cancer after CT scans in childhood found a clear dose-response relationship for both leukemia and brain tumors: risk increased with increasing cumulative radiation dose. For a cumulative dose of between 50 and 60 milligray or mGy (mGy is a unit of estimated absorbed dose of ionizing radiation) to the head, the investigators reported a threefold increase in the risk of brain tumors; the same dose to bone marrow (the part of the body responsible fo...
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14 MAR 2016 by ideonexus

 1.9 Cases of Leukemia per 10,000 CT Scans in Children

In the breakdown of results, the study authors from Group Health Research Institute and University of California, Davis note that the risk of developing leukemia was highest from head scans for kids under age 5 with a rate of 1.9 cases per 10,000 CT scans. Younger children and girls seemed more susceptible to solid cancers than older kids and boys. Every 300 to 390 scans of a girl’s abdomen or pelvis was associated with the development of one solid cancer. The study estimates that 4,870 fut...
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06 MAR 2016 by ideonexus

 Fever-Reducer Extends Illness

Multivariate analysis suggested that antipyretic therapy prolonged illness in subjects infected with influenza A, but its use was the result of prolonged illness in those infected with S. sonnei. The precise nature of these relationships requires a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
Folksonomies: fever medicine
Folksonomies: fever medicine
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This was an unintended discovery of the research on different types of influenza. Subjects who took fever-reducer were ill 3.5 days longer than those who did not.

06 MAR 2016 by ideonexus

 Iron and Fever

Warm-blooded animals have an elaborate physiological control system to maintain a constant body temperature. In man, this temperature is about 37°C. Any significant deviation from this temperature puts stress on the body and makes it difficult to maintain metabolic processes at their normal rates. Why then, during sickness, should the temperature rise? It would seem that development of fever would cause things to go from bad to worse, and make it more difficult for the body to recuperate. Fe...
Folksonomies: medicine fever
Folksonomies: medicine fever
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Fever prevents bacteria from obtaining iron in the from the blood stream,

06 MAR 2016 by ideonexus

 Fever Reducing Medicines Increase the Spread of Infection

To put our lower bound for fp into perspective, consider that approximately 41 400 (95% CI: 27 100–55 700) deaths per year are attributed to seasonal influenza epidemics in the United States [43] (and an order of magnitude more worldwide [44]). Taken at face value, our results indicate, for example, that if Embedded Image then at least 700 deaths per year (95% CI: 30–2100) (and many more serious illnesses) could be prevented in the US alone by avoiding antipyretic medication for the treat...
Folksonomies: medicine fever influenza
Folksonomies: medicine fever influenza
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19 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 The Unmentioned Trade-Offs in Life Extention

Now it is not that the cell biologists can’t point to experiments which seem to fit their views, as is common in natural science. (After all, the Earth’s Moon does indeed have a geocentric orbit.) Good colleagues of mine like Robert Reis are able to produce nematode worms that live ten times longer than their unmutated controls, if they use ingenious genetic and environmental manipulation. But nematodes have well-developed physiological machinery for sustaining states of metabolic arrest,...
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From Michael R. Rose's "Immortalist Fictions and Strategies"

04 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 An Algorithm for Predicting Longevity

For the test, participants exercised on a treadmill at increasing speed and incline. While they were exercising, the researches measured peak heart rate (%MPHR) and their ability to withstand physical exertion. On that latter point, they measured metabolic equivalents, or METs, which gauges how much energy the body expends during exercise. The more intense the exercise, the higher the METs (e.g. slow walking = ~2 METs, whereas running = ~8 METs). [...] FIT Treadmill Score = %MPHR 12(M...
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You can get your MPHR for your age here. I found a chart of METS here for various exercises.


Activity METS Activity METS
Aerobic Dancing 6.0 Running 12 min/mile 8.5
Backpacking 7.0 Racquetball 8.0
Badminton 7.0 Rugby 8.3
Basketball 6.0 Skating ice/roller 7.0
Bicycling - 24mph 5.0 Skiing cross country 8.0
Calisthenics 4.5 Soccer 8.0
Golf 5.0 Softball 5.0
Gymnastics 5.5 Swimming 6.0
Handball 8.0 Tennis 7.0
Hockey 8.0 Volleyball 4.0
Horse riding 3.5 Walking 3.5
Running 8 min/mile 12.5 Weight lifting 4.5

Bruce Protocol


Stage Minutes % grade km/h MPH METS
1 3 10 2.7 1.7 5
2 3 12 4.0 2.5 7
3 3 14 5.4 3.4 10
4 3 16 6.7 4.2 13
5 3 18 8.0 5.0 15
6 3 20 8.8 5.5 18
7 3 22 9.6 6.0 20


Total Durations = 21 minutes


So, if I'm understanding this correctly. If I reach a 160 heart rate out of 179.0 MPHR predicted for my 41 years of age while running 12 minute miles worth 8.5 METS. My score would be:

83.7 12(8.5) - 4(41) = 21.7

The same heart rate for my age running 8 minute miles:

83.7 12(8.5) - 4(41) = 69.7

24 JAN 2014 by ideonexus

 Hippocratic Oath

I swear by Apollo the physician, by Asclepius, by Heahh, by Panacea and by all the gods and goddesses, making them my witnesses, that I will carry out, according to my ability and judgment, this oath and this indenture. To hold my teacher in this art equal to my own parents; to make him partner in my livelihood; when he is in need of money to share mine with him; to consider his family as my own brothers and to teach them this art, if they want to learn it, without fee or indenture; to impart...
Folksonomies: virtue medicine oath
Folksonomies: virtue medicine oath
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The original.

29 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Chemical Cognitive Enhancers

Pharmaceutical amphetamines (such as Adderall and Ritalin) These drugs have been used withouit a prescription, for their tirednessreducing and concentration-enhancing effects, by about 5% of students in U.S. colleges, according to a recent study, with some colleges reporting rates as high as 25%. Modafinil Modafinil is a nonamphetamine stimulant, marketed to help people with narcolepsy stay awake. It has been reported as popular with otherwise healthy individuals who are using it to mai...
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Drugs to improve cognition.