18 JAN 2017 by ideonexus

 Hot Red Chili Consumption Lowers Mortality

The evidence base for the health effects of spice consumption is insufficient, with only one large population-based study and no reports from Europe or North America. Our objective was to analyze the association between consumption of hot red chili peppers and mortality, using a population-based prospective cohort from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES) III, a representative sample of US noninstitutionalized adults, in which participants were surveyed from 1988 to...
Folksonomies: longevity
Folksonomies: longevity
  1  notes
 
02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Ikigai and Mortality

Among the 43,391 subjects enrolled, 25,596 (59.0%) indicated that they found a sense of ikigai, 15,782 (36.4%) indicated they were uncertain, and 2013 (4.6%) indicated they did not find a sense of ikigai. As compared with those who found a sense of ikigai, those who did not were more likely to be unmarried, unemployed, have a lower educational level, have bad or poor self-rated health, have a high level of perceived mental stress, have severe or moderate bodily pain, have limitation of physic...
Folksonomies: mortality longevity
Folksonomies: mortality longevity
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08 MAR 2016 by ideonexus

 Physical and Actuarial Escape Velocities

The escape velocity cusp is closer than you might guess. Since we are already so long lived, even a 30% increase in healthy life span will give the first beneficiaries of rejuvenation therapies another 20 years—an eternity in science—to benefit from second-generation therapies that would give another 30%, and so on ad infinitum. Thus, if first-generation rejuvenation therapies were universally available and this progress in developing rejuvenation therapy could be indefinitely maintained,...
Folksonomies: longevity life-extension
Folksonomies: longevity life-extension
  1  notes
 
08 MAR 2016 by ideonexus

 Caloric Restriction Could Mean a 20% Extension in Lifespan

Sinclair and several other prominent gerontologists are presently seeking human therapies based on the long-standing observation that lifelong restriction of caloric intake considerably extends both the healthy and total life span of nearly all species in which it has been tried, including rodents and dogs. Drugs that elicit the gene expression changes that result from caloric restriction might, these workers assert, extend human life span by something approaching the same proportion as seen ...
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05 FEB 2016 by ideonexus

 The Stress of Cold Temperatures Extends Lifespans

In 1986, John Holloszy of Washington University immersed his lab rats in shallow, cool water for four hours each day. They burned so many extra calories that they ate half again as much as control rats, but weighed less. The cold rats lived 10% longer, on average. Holloszy framed his report on this experiment not as a hormetic effect of cold exposure, but as a refutation of the “rate of living” hypothesis. In 2006, Gordon Lithgow of the Buck Institute for Aging Research exposed lab worms...
Folksonomies: longevity
Folksonomies: longevity
  1  notes
 
29 APR 2015 by ideonexus

 Time is the Most Precious Commodity

Your Earth is a very small part of a very large industry. ... In your world, people are used to fighting for resources, like oil, minerals, or land. When you have access to the vastness of space, you realize that there's only one resource worth fighting over--even killing for--more time. Time is the singlemost precious commodity in the Universe.
  1  notes
 
27 APR 2015 by ideonexus

 Exercise "Sweet Spot" for Extending Lifespan

They found that, unsurprisingly, the people who did not exercise at all were at the highest risk of early death. But those who exercised a little, not meeting the recommendations but doing something, lowered their risk of premature death by 20 percent. Those who met the guidelines precisely, completing 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise, enjoyed greater longevity benefits and 31 percent less risk of dying during the 14-year period compared with those who never exercised. The sweet s...
Folksonomies: exercise longevity
Folksonomies: exercise longevity
  1  notes
 
07 APR 2015 by ideonexus

 Resveratrol and SIRT1

For the last decade, the science of aging has increasingly focused on sirtuins, a group of genes that are believed to protect many organisms, including mammals, against diseases of aging. Mounting evidence has demonstrated that resveratrol, a compound found in the skin of grapes as well as in peanuts and berries, increases the activity of a specific sirtuin, SIRT1, that protects the body from diseases by revving up the mitochondria, a kind of cellular battery that slowly runs down as we age. ...
Folksonomies: longevity supplements
Folksonomies: longevity supplements
  1  notes
 
07 APR 2015 by ideonexus

 Evidence on Creatine

Strong scientific evidence for this use Enhanced muscle mass / strength: Several high-quality studies have shown an increase in muscle mass with creatine use. However, some weaker studies have reported mixed results. Overall, the available evidence suggests that creatine does increase lean body mass, strength, and total work. Future studies should include the effect of individual differences such as fitness levels, sex, and age. Unclear scientific evidence for this use Athletic performance...
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06 APR 2015 by ideonexus

 Ideal Amount of Exercise for Longevity

People who got some exercise, but not enough to meet the physical activity recommendations were still 20 percent less likely to die over a 14-year period than those who did not do any physical activity. (The recommendations say to do 150 minutes of moderate activity per week or 75 minutes of vigorous activity per week.) People who engaged in the recommended level of physical activity saw even more benefit: They were 31 percent less likely to die during the study period, compared with those w...
Folksonomies: exercise longevity
Folksonomies: exercise longevity
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Who recommendation is 150 minutes moderate or 75 minutes vigorous a week. Three to five times this amount was linked with a 39% reduction in mortality; therefore, 7.5 hours moderate exercise or 3.75 hours vigorous for best results.