10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Four Game Mechanics

Agon: This ancient Greek word—meaning “struggle” or “contest”— defines those games in which some aspect of a player’s or team’s skill is measured against another player or team. Any game that is based on skill and eliminates luck is a game of agon. The best examples of this type of game are athletic games such as wrestling and baseball. The games of chess and checkers are also classic examples of agon. Contemporary abstract strategy games, such as those in the Project GIPF ser...
Folksonomies: games gaming mechanics
Folksonomies: games gaming mechanics
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 What We Learn from Games

What also went unremarked was how much I was learning by playing these games: basic ideas such as taking turns and developing patience while others completed their turns, the strengthening of simple memory, improved physical coordination, an ability to recognize and act on patterns, the capacity to see what might happen in a few turns if I took one move as opposed to another, resilience when losing, and the kind of strategic thinking that emerges once you realize that Scrabble is both a game ...
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Math Exercise: Multiple Approaches to Problem-Solving

For example, if the problem was to fi nd the answer to 8 × 6, students may suggest three options: memorizing the multiplication table for 6, knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and adding another 8 to equal 48, or adding a column of six 8s. Allowing students to personally choose among approaches all confi rmed as correct and to support their choice will increase their comfort levels. Th is process also builds math logic, intuition, and reasoning skills that extend into other academic subjects and real-...
Folksonomies: education games math exercises
Folksonomies: education games math exercises
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 "This Is Not a..." Game

A game called “Th is Is Not a...” encourages multiple solutions and is played in a relaxed environment that encourages creativity. Students pass around an object—such as a toy telephone—and say, “This is not a....” Younger students name an object that is not a toy telephone (for example, “This is not a pencil.”). Older students continue and say, “This is not a toy telephone, it is a...,” and they gesture or mime to suggest the object that they are pretending the toy teleph...
Folksonomies: education games
Folksonomies: education games
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Math Games

Buzz. An example of a low-stress, win-win game is Prime Number Buzz. Students stand in a circle or at their desks and go around the room in order, saying either the next sequential number if it is a composite or “buzz” if it is a prime. If they are incorrect, they sit down, but they keep listening and when they catch another student’s error, they stand up and rejoin the game. (The same game format works for Multiples Buzz, using multiples of, for example, 3, 4, and so on.) Telephone. T...
Folksonomies: education games math
Folksonomies: education games math
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Math Exercise: Comparisons

Select two boxes or cans of food that weigh 8 ounces and 16 ounces, respectively. Have students hold each as you tell them (or they read) the weights of the containers. Give students a box or can with the weight covered and have them compare the weight of the new package to the weight of the 8- and 16-ounce samples. Th ey can then estimate whether the new item’s weight is closer to 8 or 16 ounces. As students become more successful, they may want to predict a more specifi c weight. Ask them...
Folksonomies: education games math
Folksonomies: education games math
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03 JUN 2016 by ideonexus

 "No Man's Sky" as Humanist Adventure

The true value of No Man’s Sky lies in something both incredibly simple and breathtaking. The point of the game is to discover and share knowledge with the other inhabitants of the universe. It’s almost as if the developers took the Enlightenment-era Encycloédie and turned it into a science fiction video game; a true testament to the best qualities and powers of the Information Age. While the sheer size may overwhelm some or risk boredom for others, players shouldn’t ignore the larger...
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09 AUG 2014 by ideonexus

 The Race to 100

The children take turns rolling the dice, which are labeledu00a0zero 1s tou00a0five 1su00a0onu00a0the first die andu00a0zero 10s tou00a0five 10s on the second die. Afteru00a0a studentu00a0rolls theu00a0two dice, he takes theu00a0rodsu00a0and cubes representing the number of 10s and 1s he rolled and puts them on his mat. It is then the next player's turn to roll. When a player has ten or more 1s cubes on his mat, he must replace ten 1s with a 10s rod before he hands over the dice for the nex...
Folksonomies: education games math
Folksonomies: education games math
  1  notes
 
29 JAN 2014 by ideonexus

 1/9998 Produces Binary Output

The pattern will break down once you get past 8192, which is 2^13. That means that the pattern continues for an impressive 52 significant figures (well, it actually breaks down on the 52nd digit, which will be a 3 instead of a 2). The reason it works is that 9998 = 10^4 - 2. You can expand as   1 / (10^n - 2) = 1/10^n * 1/(1 - 2/10^n) = 1/10^n * (1 2/10^n 2^2 /10^2n 2^3 /10^3n ...) which gives the observed pattern. It breaks down when 2^k has more than n digi...
Folksonomies: games math puzzles
Folksonomies: games math puzzles
  1  notes
 
30 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 The Tapping Game

The tapping game is when I tap one time, you tap two times, and when I tap two times, you tap one time. Children play this game sixteen times, mixing up the times that children are asked to tap once when the experimenter taps twice, and tap twice when the experimenter taps once. In other words, the rules of the game keep changing, and the children need to apply their focus and attention to follow what’s going on. Blair says: What happens with four-year-olds is, in general, they’ll hang in...
Folksonomies: games parenting
Folksonomies: games parenting
  1  notes

A game for children to learn focus.