20 JUL 2017 by ideonexus

 How the fantastic becomes dull and familiar

Most fantasy RPGs follow the tried and allegedly true formula, which strips them of anything ‘fantastic’ and grounds them in the dull ‘reality’ of the familiar. Sadly, the much coveted instant recognition usually means instantly forgettable. How many times should we save an utterly predictable and generic world before it gets really old? Why is that when we see a town on the horizon, it’s not a place of wonder and strange customs, but a place to restock on FEDEX quest and trade in y...
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16 FEB 2015 by ideonexus

 Religious Children Less Capable of Distinguishing Fantasy...

In two studies, 5- and 6-year-old children were questioned about the status of the protagonist embedded in three different types of stories. In realistic stories that only included ordinary events, all children, irrespective of family background and schooling, claimed that the protagonist was a real person. In religious stories that included ordinarily impossible events brought about by divine intervention, claims about the status of the protagonist varied sharply with exposure to religion. C...
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21 APR 2014 by ideonexus

 Realism in "A Song of Ice and Fire"

Game of Thrones takes place in a land that feels somewhat post-apocalyptic — there are occasional glimmers of hints that something really bad might have happened to Westeros long ago, and that's the reason for the irregular and attenuated seasons. But even more than that, we know Westeros is on the brink of a zombie apocalypse from the very first moment of the story. And part of the genius of Martin's slow-as-soil-erosion storytelling is that the zombie threat never quite arrives, but we ke...
Folksonomies: fiction fantasy criticism
Folksonomies: fiction fantasy criticism
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The engaging storytelling is the result of its connection to how the world works with gray characters and glacial problems.

29 JUN 2013 by ideonexus

 Yu-Gi-Oh! Mixes the Real with Fantasy.

Trading cards, Game Boys, and character merchandise create what Anne Allison (2004) has called “pocket fantasies,” “digitized icons . . . that children carry with them wherever they go,” and “that straddle the border between phantasm and everyday life” (p. 42). The imagination of Yu-Gi-Oh! pervades the everyday settings of childhood as it is channeled through these portable and intimate media forms. These forms of play are one part of a broader set of shifts toward intimate and po...
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Similar to Magic the Gathering, with the player being the real and the cards the fantasy.

08 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 Rational Potter Plots to Take Over the Magical World

Professor McGonagall undoubtedly knew every last detail of how you went about turning into a cat. But she seemed to have literally never heard of the scientific method. To her it was just Muggle magic. And she didn't even seem curious about what secrets might be hiding behind the natural language understanding of the Retrieval Charm. That left two possibilities, really. Possibility one: Magic was so incredibly opaque, convoluted, and impenetrable, that even though wizards and witches had ...
Folksonomies: science fantasy fan fiction
Folksonomies: science fantasy fan fiction
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Through science!

08 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 The Rules of Magic Don't Make Any Sense

Some children would have waited until after their first trip to Diagon Alley. "Bag of element 79," Harry said, and withdrew his hand, empty, from the mokeskin pouch. Most children would have at least waited to get their wands first. "Bag of okane," said Harry. The heavy bag of gold popped up into his hand. Harry withdrew the bag, then plunged it again into the mokeskin pouch. He took out his hand, put it back in, and said, "Bag of tokens of economic exchange." That time his hand came ou...
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Rational Potter experiments with a magical bag that will give him whatever he asks for and doesn't understand why it can understand some requests but not others.

02 NOV 2012 by ideonexus

 Disneyland's Simulation Reinforces the Myth of the Real

Thus, everywhere in Disneyland the objective profile of America, down to the morphology of individuals and of the crowd, is drawn. All its values are exalted by the miniature and the comic strip. Embalmed and pacified. Whence the possibility of an ideological analysis of Disneyland (L. Marin did it very well in Utopiques, jeux d'espace [Utopias, play of space]): digest of the American way of life, panegyric of American values, idealized transposition of a contradictory reality. Certainly. But...
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It's fantasy persuades us to ignore the simulation of what we consider the "real" world. It presents itself as childish whimsy, which convinces us that what we experience daily is the "adult" world.

01 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 Speculation Informed by Science is Not the Same as Fantasy

Our search for life elsewhere is not haphazard or random: our knowledge of physics and chemistry and biology equips us to seek out meaningful information about stars and planets vast distances away and to identify planets that are at least possible candidates as hosts for life. There is much that remains deeply mysterious, and it is not likely that we will ever uncover all the secrets of a universe as vast as ours: but, armed with science, we can at least ask sensible, meaningful questions ab...
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We keep our speculations within the realm of the probable. It is imagination, but with rules, which is far more satisfying.

10 AUG 2011 by ideonexus

 The Republic of Heaven

“But what does Lord Asriel intend? What is this world, and why has he come here?” “He led us here because this world is empty. Empty of conscious life, that is. We are not colonialists, Mrs. Coulter. We haven’t come to conquer, but to build.” “And is he going to attack the Kingdom of Heaven?” Ogunwe looked at her levelly. “We’re not going to invade the Kingdom,” he said, “but if the Kingdom invades us, they had better be ready for war, because we are prepared. Mrs. C...
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The rebels in Pullman's book intend to overthrow the Kingdom of Heaven and replace it with a Republic.

10 AUG 2011 by ideonexus

 Looking at the Shadows in the Cave

“Yes,” Dr. Malone went on, “they know we’re here. They answer back. And here goes the crazy part: you can’t see them unless you expect to. Unless you put your mind in a certain state. You have to be confident and relaxed at the same time. You have to be capable- Where’s that quotation …” She reached into the muddle of papers on her desk and found a scrap on which someone had written with a green pen. She read: ” ‘… Capable of being in uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, ...
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A computer named "the cave" where users look into the shadows displayed on it and it reflects their thinking. Named for Plato's Cave, it also sounds like Tarot readings; however, in the context of the story, there is something supernatural at work too.