30 DEC 2016 by ideonexus

 Whole Earth Catalog Purpose

We are as gods and might as well get good at it. So far, remotely done power and glory—as via government, big business, formal education, church—has succeeded to the point where gross defects obscure actual gains. In response to this dilemma and to these gains a realm of intimate, personal power is developing—power of the individual to conduct his own education, find his own inspiration, shape his own environment, and share his adventure with whoever is interested. Tools that aid this p...
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29 DEC 2016 by ideonexus

 Gaming for Globalization

In today’s global society, we need games that introduce young people to their international peers and their peers’ lives all around the world. We should have games that fully represent the current scope of humanity around the globe. Let inter-ed games help liven up the history or sociology lesson and motivate players to go out and learn more by traveling and experiencing other cultures in reality. Looking to the future, I would be remiss to neglect mention of the vast potential of virtual...
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Effects of Good Teachers on Student Outcomes

These findings would suggest that the difference in achievement gains between having a 25th percentile teacher (a not so effective teacher) and a 75th percentile teacher (an effective teacher) is over one-third of a standard deviation (0.35) in reading and almost half a standard deviation (0.48) in mathematics. Similarly, the difference in achievement gains between having a 50th percentile teacher (an average teacher) and a 90th percentile teacher (a very effective teacher) is about one-third...
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Math Exercise: Multiple Approaches to Problem-Solving

For example, if the problem was to fi nd the answer to 8 × 6, students may suggest three options: memorizing the multiplication table for 6, knowing that 8 × 5 = 40 and adding another 8 to equal 48, or adding a column of six 8s. Allowing students to personally choose among approaches all confi rmed as correct and to support their choice will increase their comfort levels. Th is process also builds math logic, intuition, and reasoning skills that extend into other academic subjects and real-...
Folksonomies: education games math exercises
Folksonomies: education games math exercises
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 "This Is Not a..." Game

A game called “Th is Is Not a...” encourages multiple solutions and is played in a relaxed environment that encourages creativity. Students pass around an object—such as a toy telephone—and say, “This is not a....” Younger students name an object that is not a toy telephone (for example, “This is not a pencil.”). Older students continue and say, “This is not a toy telephone, it is a...,” and they gesture or mime to suggest the object that they are pretending the toy teleph...
Folksonomies: education games
Folksonomies: education games
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Math Games

Buzz. An example of a low-stress, win-win game is Prime Number Buzz. Students stand in a circle or at their desks and go around the room in order, saying either the next sequential number if it is a composite or “buzz” if it is a prime. If they are incorrect, they sit down, but they keep listening and when they catch another student’s error, they stand up and rejoin the game. (The same game format works for Multiples Buzz, using multiples of, for example, 3, 4, and so on.) Telephone. T...
Folksonomies: education games math
Folksonomies: education games math
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Math Exercise: Comparisons

Select two boxes or cans of food that weigh 8 ounces and 16 ounces, respectively. Have students hold each as you tell them (or they read) the weights of the containers. Give students a box or can with the weight covered and have them compare the weight of the new package to the weight of the 8- and 16-ounce samples. Th ey can then estimate whether the new item’s weight is closer to 8 or 16 ounces. As students become more successful, they may want to predict a more specifi c weight. Ask them...
Folksonomies: education games math
Folksonomies: education games math
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Use a Big Opening for Class

In your planning, consider what you most want students to know and then work backward to develop an opening that promotes sustained interest toward that goal. If possible, represent the unit in several different ways that appeal to different learning strengths and levels of achievable challenge so you can continually engage all students. Here are some fascinating facts you can use as “big openings” with your students to help them with number sense, specifi cally with understanding large ...
Folksonomies: education teaching math
Folksonomies: education teaching math
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Mathematical Cue Words

Addition: add, plus, sum, total, altogether, increased by, grew, gained, total of, combined, more than (as in, “3 more than 7 is 10”), put together, in all Subtraction: minus, take away, diff erence, less than, from, remove, subtract, gives away, sells, loses, fewer than, decreased by, diff erence between Multiplication: product, times, doubled (tripled, etc.), some problems give information about one and ask for total amounts (also, when dealing with multiplication of fractions, of us...
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Delay Method of Errorless Math Practice

Prepare a list of the calculations from the flash cards on a sheet of paper. These can be on a template, with multiplication facts at the appropriate level pulled and copied for the student. On these forms, include three columns next to each multiplication question, labeled “correct repeat,” “correct wait,” and “correct response.” Start with review and confi dence building. For example, show the question 3 × 4 = __ on the card and without any delay say the answer. Th e student re...
Folksonomies: education methodology math
Folksonomies: education methodology math
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