22 NOV 2013 by ideonexus

 Nettlesomeness

...Carlsen is demonstrating one of his most feared qualities, namely his “nettlesomeness,” to use a term coined for this purpose by Ken Regan. Using computer analysis, you can measure which players do the most to cause their opponents to make mistakes. Carlsen has the highest nettlesomeness score by this metric, because his creative moves pressure the other player and open up a lot of room for mistakes. In contrast, a player such as Kramnik plays a high percentage of very accurate move...
Folksonomies: chess strategy game theory
Folksonomies: chess strategy game theory
  1  notes

A characteristic of chess players. A measure of how often they make moves that cause their opponent to make mistakes.

13 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 Freestyle Chess

In fact, the best game of chess in the world right now might be played neither by man nor machine.47 In 2005, the Web site ChessBase.com, hosted a “freestyle” chess tournament: players were free to supplement their own insight with any computer program or programs that they liked, and to solicit advice over the Internet. Although several grandmasters entered the tournament, it was won neither by the strongest human players nor by those using the most highly regarded software, but by a pai...
Folksonomies: games chess
Folksonomies: games chess
  1  notes

Similar to correspondence chess, where computer programs are allowed to offer suggestions and the players act like coaches directing the moves.

13 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 The Difference Between Average and Great Chessmasters

Great players like Kasparov do not delude themselves into thinking they can calculate all these possibilities. This is what separates elite players from amateurs. In his famous study of chess players, the Dutch psychologist Adriaan de Groot found that amateur players, when presented with a chess problem, often frustrated themselves by looking for the perfect move, rendering themselves incapable of making any move at all. Chess masters, by contrast, are looking for a good move—and certainly...
Folksonomies: thinking chess
Folksonomies: thinking chess
  1  notes

The great do not overthink, but rely on intuition to guide them. They do not look for a perfect move, but an advantageous move.

13 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 The Three Phases of a Chess Game

A chess game, like everything else, has three parts: the beginning, the middle and the end. What’s a little different about chess is that each of these phases tests different intellectual and emotional skills, making the game a mental triathlon of speed, strength, and stamina. In the beginning of a chess game the center of the board is void, with pawns, rooks, and bishops neatly aligned in the first two rows awaiting instructions from their masters. The possibilities are almost infinite. W...
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And how computers do in processing them versus a human's intuition.

15 NOV 2012 by ideonexus

 The Way of Chess

The Way of chess: The best place is the middle of the board, The worst is the side, And the comers are neither good nor bad. This is the eternal law of chess. The law says: "It is better to lose a piece Than to lose the initiative. When you are struck on the left, look to the right, When attacked in the rear, keep an eye on your front. Sometimes the leader is really behind, Sometimes the laggard is really ahead. If you have two 'live' areas do not let them be severed; If you can survive as yo...
Folksonomies: games rules chess
Folksonomies: games rules chess
  1  notes

A poem about the general strategies to use.

21 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Understanding Physics is Like Learning Chess

The physicist is like someone who's watching people playing chess and, after watching a few games, he may have worked out what the moves in the game are. But understanding the rules is just a trivial preliminary on the long route from being a novice to being a grand master. So even if we understand all the laws of physics, then exploring their consequences in the everyday world where complex structures can exist is a far more daunting task, and that's an inexhaustible one I'm sure.
  1  notes

Quoting Sir Martin Rees: Learning the moves is the beginning, but there is still much to learn about the strategy.