20 MAR 2018 by ideonexus

 Adult Physical Activity Keeps Immune System Young

It is widely accepted that aging is accompanied by remodelling of the immune system including thymic atrophy and increased frequency of senescent T cells, leading to immune compromise. However, physical activity, which influences immunity but declines dramatically with age, is not considered in this literature. We assessed immune profiles in 125 adults (55–79 years) who had maintained a high level of physical activity (cycling) for much of their adult lives, 75 age-matched older adults and ...
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24 DEC 2016 by ideonexus

 Different Measure of Intelligence Peak at Different Ages

One potential concern with cross-sectional data is that it may be subject to cohort effects. Our findings in Experiment 2 are consistent with the possibility that people born in 1945 have unusually large vocabularies, people born in 1980 have unusually good working memory, and people born in 1990 have unusually fast processing speed. Such concerns can be mitigated by converging results from cross-sectional datasets collected at different times (Schaie, 2005). Here, we compared results derived...
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08 JUL 2016 by ideonexus

 Age-Related Decline in Strength as Decline Neurons

“What we have here is (a) failure to communicate,” said the Captain in the 1967 film Cool Hand Luke. This line rings true today as it relates to the failure of physiologists to communicate the mechanisms of muscle strength to the geriatrics community, where the lack of muscle strength observed in older adults holds high clinical significance. Similarly, there is a relative under recognition in the scientific community for the potential role of the brain’s failure to communicate with ske...
Folksonomies: cognition aging strength
Folksonomies: cognition aging strength
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As the neurons controlling muscle fibers die off, those muscles grow weaker. Possibly exercising muscles might keep signals going to those neurons and keep them alive, staving off age-related cognitive decline.

24 MAY 2016 by ideonexus

 Busyness Correlated with Improved Cognitive Performance

Sustained engagement in mentally challenging activities has been shown to improve memory in older adults. We hypothesized that a busy schedule would be a proxy for an engaged lifestyle and would facilitate cognition. Here, we examined the relationship between busyness and cognition in adults aged 50–89. Participants (N = 330) from the Dallas Lifespan Brain Study (DLBS) completed a cognitive battery and the Martin and Park Environmental Demands Questionnaire (MPED), an assessment of busyness...
Folksonomies: cognition aging
Folksonomies: cognition aging
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27 NOV 2013 by ideonexus

 Okinawa Culture as a Blue Zone

We found our second Blue Zone on the other side of the planet, about 800 miles south of Tokyo, on the archipelago of Okinawa. Okinawa is actually 161 small islands. And in the northern part of the main island, this is ground zero for world longevity. This is a place where the oldest living female population is found. It's a place where people have the longest disability-free life expectancy in the world. They have what we want. They live a long time, and tend to die in their sleep, very quick...
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Habits and culture of the people with the longest life-expectancy on the planet.

27 NOV 2013 by ideonexus

 The Value of the Elderly

A challenge for society is to make use of those things that older people are better at doing. Some abilities, of course, decrease with age. Those include abilities at tasks requiring physical strength and stamina, ambition, and the power of novel reasoning in a circumscribed situation, such as figuring out the structure of DNA, best left to scientists under the age of 30. Conversely, valuable attributes that increase with age include experience, understanding of people and human relationship...
Folksonomies: society aging elderly
Folksonomies: society aging elderly
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Their experience makes them better-skilled for certain professions, such as managing, and teaching.

29 MAR 2013 by ideonexus

 Learning New Langugages Instills Brain Growth

Even something that has been traditionally seen as the purview of the young—the ability to learn new languages —continues to change the landscape of the brain late into life. When a group of adults took a nine-month intensive course in modern standard Chinese, their brains’ white matter reorganized progressively (as measured monthly) in the left hemisphere language areas and their right hemisphere counterparts—as well as in t h e genu (anterior end) of the corpus collosum, that networ...
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Adults who learned Chinese showed white matter reorganization in their brains.

07 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Old Kepler On Reading His Young Work

I myself, a professional mathematician, on re-reading my own work find it strains my mental powers to recall to mind from the figures the meanings of the demonstrations, meanings which I myself originally put into the figures and the text from my mind. But when I attempt to remedy the obscurity of the material by putting in extra words, I see myself falling into the opposite fault of becoming chatty in something mathematical.
Folksonomies: age aging youth
Folksonomies: age aging youth
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He has a hard time understanding them, but when he tries to work in easier explanations, he finds himself being verbose.

02 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 Davy Poem on Growing Old

Davy was now forty, and like every man of science and every poet, he hoped against hope that original work and ‘powers of inspiration’ still lay ahead in his maturity. His description of these longings was nakedly Romantic, and surely recalled his moonlit walks along the banks of the Avon some twenty years before. Though many chequered years have passed away Since first the sense of Beauty thrilled my nerves, Yet still my heart is sensible to Thee, As when it first received the flood of ...
Folksonomies: discovery aging growing old
Folksonomies: discovery aging growing old
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And hoping he still had discoveries ahead of him.

03 SEP 2011 by ideonexus

 The Effects of Aging and How Exercise Counteracts Them

• Motor neurons die, particularly from age 60 onward. This causes connections between muscle fibers to wither — and that, in turn, eventually leads to loss and shrinking of muscle fibers. As a result, muscles get smaller and a person gets weaker, says Sandra Hunter, an associate professor of exercise science at Marquette University in Milwaukee. "Physical activity can offset some of that," she says. "But there is this biological aging process going on — the neurons will die regardle...
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A bullet point list of some of the physiological effects of aging and how exercise reverses these trends.