22 NOV 2017 by ideonexus

 Top-Down Engineering of AI

The philosophers’ fascination with propositions was mirrored in good old-fashioned AI, the AI of John McCarthy, early Marvin Minsky, and Allen Newell, Herbert Simon, and Cliff Shaw. It was the idea that the way to make an intelligent agent was from the top down. You have a set of propositions in some proprietary formulation. It’s not going to be English—well, maybe LISP or something like that, where you define all the predicates and the operators. Then, you have this huge database that ...
  1  notes
 
07 AUG 2017 by ideonexus

 Constructable Strategy Game Patent

A game, toy or article of manufacture includes a set of rules and at least one model. The model has multiple movable parts, where under the rules of play, the model begins in an assembled configuration. As the model loses points under the rules of play, at least some of the parts are removed from the model, or replaced with substitute parts. The model may be formed from a panel or other substantially planar member, with the individual pieces formed therein.
Folksonomies: gaming patent
Folksonomies: gaming patent
  1  notes
20 JUL 2017 by ideonexus

 Cooperative Game of Competitive Questioning

Great Cooperative games make the play experience deliberately difficult; the game shouldn't be a cake walk. Mr. Glass's decision, therefore, is for him to assume the role of the game and present himself in opposition to his students—the players. He does this by instructing his students (working in groups designed to get everyone working together, especially those who have struggled in the past) to prepare 30 questions that, in their estimation, adequately assess or measure the topics with w...
  1  notes
02 JUN 2015 by ideonexus

 Language as Set Theory

The revolution in our understanding of the logic of names began with a basic question: Where do the meanings of words live? There are two likely habitats. One is the world, where we find the things that a word refers to. The other is in the head, where we find people’s understanding of how a word may be used. For anyone interested in language as a window into the mind, the external world might seem to be an unpromising habitat. The word cat, for example, refers to the set of all the cats t...
Folksonomies: semantics set theory
Folksonomies: semantics set theory
  1  notes
 
26 APR 2015 by ideonexus

 Shock: Social Science Fiction

What happens when a mind is no longer tied to a body? What happens when those of greatest ability are enslaved by those of greatest power? What happens when Humanity is the new kid on the block? When minds are read like books and books are illegal? Shock: Social Science Fiction is a game, a set of rules, that you’re about to use with your friends to create some science fiction stories. You’ll create a world sitting around a table, or on a floor in a circle, and use these rules to reach a...
  1  notes

Collaborative Storytelling.

25 FEB 2015 by ideonexus

 RPG as Cooperative Experience

A role-playing game is a cooperative experience between multiple participants. At its simplest, it can be described as an organized form of group make-believe, with a set of rules and procedures to keep things consistent and fair. The goal is not to win - there are no real "winners" in a role-playing game - but simply to have a good time.
Folksonomies: rpg role-playing game
Folksonomies: rpg role-playing game
  1  notes
 
09 AUG 2014 by ideonexus

 König’s paradox: Ordinals

Let’s start by turning back the clock. It is India in the fifth century BCE, the age of the historical Buddha, and a rather peculiar principle of reasoning appears to be in general use. This principle is called the catuskoti, meaning ‘four corners’. It insists that there are four possibilities regarding any statement: it might be true (and true only), false (and false only), both true and false, or neither true nor false. [...] To get back to something that the Buddha might recognise,...
Folksonomies: mathematics paradox
Folksonomies: mathematics paradox
  1  notes

Also Betrand Russel's "Set of All Sets that Do Not Contain Themselves"

09 AUG 2014 by ideonexus

 What We Don't Get About Science

The whole point of science is that most of it is uncertain. That's why science is exciting--because we don't know. Science is all about things we don't understand. The public, of course, imagines science is just a set of facts. But it's not. Science is a process of exploring, which is always partial. We explore, and we find out things that we understand. We find out things we thought we understood were wrong. That's how it makes progress.
  1  notes
 
23 OCT 2013 by ideonexus

 The Chinese Room Argument

Suppose that I'm locked in a room and given a large batch of Chinese writing. Suppose furthermore (as is indeed the case) that I know no Chinese, either written or spoken, and that I'm not even confident that I could recognize Chinese writing as Chinese writing distinct from, say, Japanese writing or meaningless squiggles. To me, Chinese writing is just so many meaningless squiggles. Now suppose further that after this first batch of Chinese writing I am given a second batch of Chines...
  1  notes

An argument against the possibility of AI, replacing a computer with an english-speaking human being performing english-instructions on chinese symbols and outputting results. This is like a computer, which does not understand the symbols it is manipulating, but the results look intelligent.

10 OCT 2013 by mxplx

 Reflective equilibrium

No moral position is universal and that each society makes its own moral rules unfettered, so that even acts we would view as unequivocally immoral could be morally unobjectionable in some other culture. kayan people in vietnam put rings around their neck   general conformity to values, especially if it is cited in mainstream media as opposed to those who thought independently
   notes

Reflective equilibrium is a state of balance or coherence among a set of beliefs arrived at by a process of deliberative mutual adjustment among general principles and particular judgments