10 FEB 2018 by ideonexus

 Adult Participation in Children's Worldplay

In The Brightening Glance: Imagination and Childhood (2006), the art theorist Ellen Handler Spitz argues that "[t]he topic of adult participation in children's play is delicate, complex, and controversial," largely due to the overwhelming influence a parent or a teacher or even adult-generated entertainment media can have. Adults must work hard not to impose their owti interests, methods, or judgments upon play activity. The act of modeling and encouraging can, indeed, be fi-aught with miss...
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22 AUG 2016 by ideonexus

 The Whole Child Mantra

Recently, I have been struck by the research concerning mindfulness. Just allowing our children time at the beginning of the day to meditate seems to do wonders in focusing them for the day. Even something as simple as repeating a phrase seems to alter our brainwaves and wire us for success. So I posit, after all we know, both through research and our own experiences, that we check ourselves every day and ask, Did I support the whole child today? Let it be our mantra—healthy, safe, engaged...
Folksonomies: mindfulness whole child
Folksonomies: mindfulness whole child
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06 MAR 2016 by ideonexus

 Fever-Reducer Extends Illness

Multivariate analysis suggested that antipyretic therapy prolonged illness in subjects infected with influenza A, but its use was the result of prolonged illness in those infected with S. sonnei. The precise nature of these relationships requires a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
Folksonomies: fever medicine
Folksonomies: fever medicine
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This was an unintended discovery of the research on different types of influenza. Subjects who took fever-reducer were ill 3.5 days longer than those who did not.

09 NOV 2015 by ideonexus

 Non-English Languages Lack the Words for Talking About Te...

By the early 19th century, just three—French, English, and German—accounted for the bulk of scientists’ communication and published research; by the second half of the 20th century, only English remained dominant as the U.S. strengthened its place in the world, and its influence in the global scientific community has continued to increase ever since. As a consequence, the scientific vocabularies of many languages have failed to keep pace with new developments and discoveries. In many l...
Folksonomies: culture technology
Folksonomies: culture technology
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19 FEB 2015 by ideonexus

 'Yo' as a Gender-Neutral Pronoun

Margaret Troyer, a former Baltimore-area teacher, published the first paper showing that "yo" is being used to replace "he" and "she." Troyer first noticed it while she was teaching middle-school kids in the area. "Some examples would be 'yo wearing a jacket,' " Troyer says, referring to her research. "Another example from the paper is, 'Yo threw a thumbtack at me,' which is a typical middle school example." So Troyer began to study her students. She gave them blank cartoons and asked them ...
Folksonomies: gender language
Folksonomies: gender language
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22 JAN 2014 by ideonexus

 Science is Culture, Not Just Methods

The fruitful pursuit of scientific truth and its application, once discovered, is not just a matter of talented individuals well trained in foreign universities and supplied with the equipment they desire. These are very important, but the cultivation of science is a collective undertaking [written as 'understanding'! and success in it depends on an appropriate social structurc. This social structure is the scientific community and its specialised institutions.
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The research and application are important, but the communal nature of discovery and understanding are crucial.

30 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Card Sorting Games for Young Children

Dimensional Change Card Sorting Task In the Dimensional Change Card Sorting Task (DCCS), children are initially asked to sort cards by a single dimension (such as color), and are subsequently required to alter their strategy to sort cards based on a second dimension (such as shape).[18] Typically, three-year-old children are able to sort cards based on a single dimension, but are unable to switch to sort the cards based on a second dimension. However, five-year-old children are able to sort ...
Folksonomies: games parenting
Folksonomies: games parenting
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Games for very young children to test their cognitive flexibility

19 DEC 2013 by ideonexus

 Understanding Awe

It can be hard to generalize what people consider jaw-dropping, but Vohs says research demonstrates what consistently creates an awesome experience. Travel ranks high. So does gazing at the cosmos on a clear night or watching a sensational film, as well as anytime we encounter massive quantities: colorful tulips in bloom, a bustling market in India, or a stunning school of fish. Novelty and perceptual vastness forces us into the present moment. The study underscores the importance of cultiva...
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The sense of wonder has health benefits, may open us up to learning new information, but what is it exactly?

08 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Doctors are Always Under Attack

Doctors have been exposed—you always will be exposed—to the attacks of those persons who consider their own undisciplined emotions more important than the world's most bitter agonies—the people who would limit and cripple and hamper research because they fear research may be accompanied by a little pain and suffering.
Folksonomies: research suffering
Folksonomies: research suffering
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By those who consider their emotions more important than suffering caused by research.