20 JUN 2017 by ideonexus

 Be Part of Where You Live

What concerns me is how our information networks have enabled us to become hyper-connected to geographically distant communities, while at the same time disconnected from our local ones. Virtual and long-distance relationships can enrich our lives in myriad ways, but I fear that our reliance on them has the potential to erode our physical communities and diminish our sense of place. Wendell Berry once said that “If you don’t know where you are, you don’t know who you are.” Knowing wh...
Folksonomies: social media locality local
Folksonomies: social media locality local
 1  1  notes
 
24 MAR 2013 by ideonexus

 Enthusiasm Improves Productivity

When we are engaged in what we are doing, all sorts of things happen. We persist longer at difficult problems—and become more likely to solve them. We experience something that psychologist Tory Higgins refers to as flow, a presence of mind that not only allows us to extract more from whatever it is we are doing but also makes us feel better and happier: we derive actual, measurable hedonic value from the strength of our active involvement in and attention to an activity, even if the activi...
Folksonomies: attention focus enthusiasm
Folksonomies: attention focus enthusiasm
 1  1  notes

And it creates a cycle of enthusiasm as our accomplishments increase our positive outlook on the task, increasing our focus.

31 OCT 2012 by ideonexus

 The Difference Between Pretend and Simulation

To dissimulate is to pretend not to have what one has. To simulate is to feign to have what one doesn't have. One implies a presence, the other an absence. But it is more complicated than that because simulating is not pretending: "Whoever fakes an illness can simply stay in bed and make everyone believe he is ill. Whoever simulates an illness produces in himself some of the symptoms" (Littré). Therefore, pretending, or dissimulating, leaves the principle of reality intact: the difference is...
  1  notes

When a person pretends to be ill, they just lie in bed; but when they simulate illness, they produce actual symptoms, thus blurring the lines of reality.

22 JUN 2012 by ideonexus

 Seneca on Ancient Forests

When you enter some grove, peopled with ancient trees, such as are higher than ordinary, and whose boughs are so closely interwoven that you cannot see the sky; the stately loftiness of the wood, the privacy of the place, and the awful gloom, cannot but strike you, as with the presence of a deity.
Folksonomies: nature
Folksonomies: nature
  1  notes

Standing in one is like being in the presence of a deity.

23 APR 2012 by ideonexus

 Why a Machine Cannot Fully Imitate a Man

I specifically paused to show that, if there were such machines with the organs and shape of a monkey or of some other non-rational animal, we would have no way of discovering that they are not the same as these animals. But if there were machines that resembled our bodies and if they imitated our actions as much as is morally possible, we would always have two very certain means for recognizing that, none the less, they are not genuinely human. The first is that they would never be able to u...
 1  1  notes

Descartes reasoning sounds like a precursor to the Turing Test.

01 JAN 2012 by ideonexus

 We Have Announced Our Presence to the Stars

There are those who predict a dire catastrophe if we broadcast our presence to another star. The extraterrestrials will come and – eat us, or something equally unpleasant. (Actually, if we are especially tasty, they need only sample one of us, determine what sequence of our amino acids makes us appetizing, and then reconstruct the relevant proteins on their own planet. The high freightage makes us economically, if not gastronomically, unappetizing.) The message aboard Pioneer 10 was critici...
  1  notes

Jazz-band radio broadcasts are our first emissaries into space, now nearly 100 light years out.

27 JUL 2011 by ideonexus

 No Commercial Product is Shown to Improve Baby Cognitive ...

Believe it or not, no commercial product has ever been shown in a scientifically responsible manner (or even in an irresponsible non-scientific manner) to do anything to improve the brain performance of a developing fetus. There have been no double-blind, randomized experiments whose independent variable was the presence or absence of the gadget. No rigorous studies showing that an in utero education curriculum produced long-term academic benefits when the child entered high school. No tw...
  1  notes

There is no research supporting any product doing anything.

21 MAY 2011 by ideonexus

 Get Babies Used to Strangers

Grandmother says, "You had them and you should never leave them." Such martyrdom is selfish and harmful to both you and the child. Someday such clinging, dependent children will have to be torn from their mothers and get the rude shock that there are other people m the world—on the first day at school, for instance. This shock will be far less and the adjustment to the presence of other residents of this planet far better if they get a sneak preview in advance that there are others. There i...
Folksonomies: child rearing
Folksonomies: child rearing
  1  notes

To prevent them from being to clingy later in life.

08 JAN 2011 by ideonexus

 The Economics of a Computer for Every Child in School

What these people are saying needs to be faced squarely. They are wrong. Let's consider the cohort of children who will enter kindergarten in the year 1987, the "Class of 2000," and let's do some arithmetic. The direct public cost of schooling a child for thirteen years, from kindergarten through twelfth grade is over $20,000 today (and for the class of 2000, it may be closer to $30,000). A conservatively high estimate of the cost of supplying each of these children with a personal computer w...
  1  notes

Providing a computer for every school child is not as costly as it seems, and the costs would be recuperated in improved learning, shortened schooling. These costs are 30 years old, and computers are much cheaper now.

03 JAN 2011 by ideonexus

 Lurkers Are Not Part of the Community

Clearly, some things do not foster community. You do not need a real identity, but you need some identity. You need to have a voice, a reputation, a presence to be part of a community, because it is (at least) a two-way propositions. Thus "lurkers," people who only read or listen, are not really part of a community. They may fancy themselves to be, but no one would miss them if they left. They are fans, not friends. Lurkers may latch on to a culture, but they do not contribute to it. (That's ...
Folksonomies: memetics community
Folksonomies: memetics community
 1  1  notes

Lurkers are fans, they are not participants; however, they could become participants if the system encourages it, like how Slashdot does with their comment rating system.