08 JAN 2018 by ideonexus

 Focus on Producing Information, Not Consuming

The production of information is critical to a healthy information diet. It's the thing that makes it so that your information consumption has purpose. I cannot think of more important advice to give anyone: start your day with a producer mindset, not a consumer mindset. If you begin your day checking the news, checking your email, and checking your notifications, you've launched yourself into a day of grazing a mindless consumption. [...] But there's something else that being a producer do...
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Workspace is Gamespace

It's not surprising that gamespace has become a workplace for hundreds of thousands of "gold famers" who undertake dreary, repetitive labor to produce virtual wealth that's sold to players with more money and less patience than them. The structural differences between in-game play and in-game work are mostly arbitrary, and "real" work is half a game, anyway. Most of the people you see going to work today are LARPing an incredibly boring RPG called "professionalism" that requires them to alter...
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Gamification Stock Holding Mechanic

Mrs. Lazarus has some experience with games such as this and decides to construct a blank environment (a planet without biomes) with a 10 × 10 grid, thereby creating a board with 100 squares. Before play, each student is given three different animals or plants (one with a broad tolerance for several different habitats, one that is a bit more particular, and one that is very fussy indeed). The players then use their numbered tiles and shares to shape and manipulate this blank environment to t...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Gamification Simultaneous Action Selection Mechanic

Dr. Mays uses the Simultaneous Action Selection mechanic to structure his lesson. He creates two decks of cards—one with names of different cellular components (e.g., ribosomes, endoplasmic reticulum) and another with a wide assortment of cellular functions and processes. He seats students in groups of five or six and explains the rules. During each turn, one student is going to pick a card from the component deck and read it out loud. Then the other students select a card from their hand (...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
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10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Gamification Memory Mechanic

In Memory games, the action of the game has some element that is dependent on players’ memory. This is simple and straightforward enough on its surface, but it becomes interestingly complex when examined in greater detail. What particular parts of memory are being tasked by the game? Some games ask the player to memorize and recall specific details or patterns. Others call on memories that a player brings into the game from his or her actual life. Still other memory games ask players not on...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Gamification Hand Mechanic

Mr. Hedges realizes that this technique could neatly simulate the complexity of the Iowa caucuses. He creates a deck of cards to represent Democratic and Republican candidates and all of the different kinds of factions and perspectives that might influence how voters behave in their individual caucus sites. He has one of his classes play a Democratic caucus and the other play a Republican one. The game he creates is played over three turns (coffee hour, early evening, evening). Players are as...
Folksonomies: education gamification
Folksonomies: education gamification
  1  notes
 
10 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Six Fundamental Properties of Games

All games are in some way a combination of the four “mother” mechanics: agon, alea, mimicry, and ilinx. Games have strict rules that all players must follow. Game-winning conditions are clearly defined. There are many different ways a game can end—not just one. In other words, there’s a way to win and (usually) lots of ways to lose. Players try hard to win because winning is desirable. Games can be played repeatedly with different outcomes.
Folksonomies: gaming
Folksonomies: gaming
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02 SEP 2016 by ideonexus

 Gamification: Ability-Based Challenge

In a study of what makes video games so captivating, the key element was found to be variable ability-based challenge for players. Th e most popular games took players through increasingly challenging levels as they became more and more skillful. As skill improved, the next challenge motivated new mastery to just the right extent such that the player could reach the next goal with practice and persistence. Th e most motivating video games are ones in which players make the correct move about ...
Folksonomies: gamification
Folksonomies: gamification
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03 JUN 2016 by ideonexus

 "No Man's Sky" as Humanist Adventure

The true value of No Man’s Sky lies in something both incredibly simple and breathtaking. The point of the game is to discover and share knowledge with the other inhabitants of the universe. It’s almost as if the developers took the Enlightenment-era Encycloédie and turned it into a science fiction video game; a true testament to the best qualities and powers of the Information Age. While the sheer size may overwhelm some or risk boredom for others, players shouldn’t ignore the larger...
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15 MAY 2015 by ideonexus

 Role of the Dungeon Master

A Dungeon Master gets to wear many hats. As the architect of a campaign, the DM creates adventures by placing monsters, traps, and treasures for the other players' characters (the adventurers) to discover. As a storyteller, the DM helps the other players visualize what's happening around them, improvising when the adventurers do something or go somewhere unexpected. As an actor, the DM plays the roles of the monsters and supporting characters, breathing life into them. And as a referee, the D...
Folksonomies: storytelling roleplaying
Folksonomies: storytelling roleplaying
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