15 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 Emulate Water

虛實: 夫兵形象水,水之形,避高而趨下:兵之形,避實而擊虛;水因地而制流,兵因敵而制勝。故兵無常勢,水無常形;能因敵變化而取勝,謂之神。故五行無常勝,四時無常位,日有短長,月有死生。 Weak Points and Strong:...: Military tactics are like unto water; for water in its natural course runs away from high places and hastens downwards. So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong and to strike at what is weak. W...
Folksonomies: war strategy wargaming
Folksonomies: war strategy wargaming
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15 MAR 2017 by ideonexus

 All War is Based on Deception

兵者,詭道也。故能而示之不能,用而示之不用,近而示之遠,遠而示之近。利而誘之,亂而取之,實而備之,強而避之,怒而撓之,卑而驕之,佚而勞之,親而離之。攻其無備,出其不意,此兵家之勝,不可先傳也。 All warfare is based on deception. Hence, when able to attack, we must seem unable; when using our forces, we must seem inactive; when we are near, we must make the enemy believe we are far away;when far awa...
Folksonomies: war strategy wargaming
Folksonomies: war strategy wargaming
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03 JAN 2017 by ideonexus

 Evolving Rules of a Wargame

We then began to humanise that wild and fearful fowl, the gun. We decided that a gun could not be fired if there were not six—afterwards we reduced the number to four—men within six inches of it. And we ruled that a gun could not both fire and move in the same general move: it could either be fired or moved (or left alone). If there were less than six men within six inches of a gun, then we tried letting it fire as many shots as there were men, and we permitted a single man to move a gun,...
Folksonomies: history gaming
Folksonomies: history gaming
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24 DEC 2016 by ideonexus

 Number Scrabble: Numerical Tic-Tac-Toe

In psychological research on problem-solving, sometimes the game of Tic-Tac-Toe is employed, which, though very simple to learn and play, still offers sufficient problems to the investigator in that it is not at all clear what heuristics are used by the subjects, except avoiding the winning move of the opponent. The same is apparently true for the isomorphic game of Number Scrabble, which is based on the fact that there exists a 3 X 3 magic square, of which rows, columns, and main diagonals a...
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22 NOV 2013 by ideonexus

 Nettlesomeness

...Carlsen is demonstrating one of his most feared qualities, namely his “nettlesomeness,” to use a term coined for this purpose by Ken Regan. Using computer analysis, you can measure which players do the most to cause their opponents to make mistakes. Carlsen has the highest nettlesomeness score by this metric, because his creative moves pressure the other player and open up a lot of room for mistakes. In contrast, a player such as Kramnik plays a high percentage of very accurate move...
Folksonomies: chess strategy game theory
Folksonomies: chess strategy game theory
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A characteristic of chess players. A measure of how often they make moves that cause their opponent to make mistakes.

22 OCT 2013 by ideonexus

 The Steel Man Argument

Sometimes the term "steel man" is used to refer to a position's or argument's improved form. A straw man is a misrepresentation of someone's position or argument that is easy to defeat: a "steel man" is an improvement of someone's position or argument that is harder to defeat than their originally stated position or argument.
Folksonomies: debate
Folksonomies: debate
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Contrasts with the straw man, work from an idealized articulation of your opponent's viewpoint and try to improve upon it.

22 OCT 2013 by ideonexus

 The Point of Argument

The point of a good argument isn’t for one person to simply win over the other. It’s ideally for both to come away with cognitive gains. Even if the goal of an argument is to reach a decision, the goal isn’t to win, the goal is to define the parameters for a good decision and then make the best possible decision with that in mind. I’ve come to believe that when two reasonably smart people disagree on a subject, at the core, it is often because one of the following: One or both of the ...
Folksonomies: debate logic
Folksonomies: debate logic
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The goal should be to define the parameters of where everyone can agree.

18 MAY 2011 by ideonexus

 Understanding Other Points of View

A few weeks before the debates, however, they are informed that it is the task of each to present the point of view of the opponent in a way that's satisfactory to the opponent - so the opponent will say, 'Yes, that's a fair presentation of my views.' In the joint written debate they explore their differences, but also how the debate process has helped them better to understand the opposing point of view.
Folksonomies: politics rhetoric debate
Folksonomies: politics rhetoric debate
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People in debates should be required to articulate the opposing viewpoint to their opponent's satisfaction.