27 JUN 2017 by ideonexus

 Socrates on How Written Word Will Destroy Memory

or this discovery of yours will create forgetfulness in the learners’ souls, because they will not use their memories; they will trust to the external written characters and not remember of themselves. The specific which you have discovered is an aid not to memory, but to reminiscence, and you give your disciples not truth, but only the semblance of truth; they will be hearers of many things and will have learned nothing; they will appear to be omniscient and will generally know nothing; th...
Folksonomies: luddism technophobia
Folksonomies: luddism technophobia
  1  notes
 
29 DEC 2016 by ideonexus

 Presidents Have Less Impact On Our Lives Than Those Aroun...

Presidents are royalty and we measure our lives by their reigns, but their effect on the country in general is greatly exaggerated. Take me, for example. Mr. Lyndon Johnson’s Selective Service System more or less governed my 20s, and now that I’m old and shaky, his Medicare is very helpful, but for most of us, presidents are part of the scenery, like the great stone heads on Easter Island. Millions of words have been written about Richard Nixon but his effect on my life was minuscule comp...
Folksonomies: politics priorities
Folksonomies: politics priorities
  1  notes
 
03 NOV 2015 by ideonexus

 The Myth of the Brain as a Video Camera

Before we discuss what current research tells us about memory and recall, it may be helpful to address a common misconception that emerged from the work ofCanadian neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield in the 1930s and 1940s. Penfield reported that during surgery, an electrical stimulation of the temporal lobe produced episodes of recall, almost like seeing movie clips. Many concluded that the brain ―videotaped‖ life, and to remember things, our memories simply needed to be prompted. But these epi...
Folksonomies: cognition memory
Folksonomies: cognition memory
  1  notes
 
19 MAR 2015 by ideonexus

 Defining "Posthuman"

I shall define a posthuman as a being that has at least one posthuman capacity. By a posthuman capacity, I mean a general central capacity greatly exceeding the maximum attainable by any current human being without recourse to new technological means. I will use general central capacity to refer to the following: healthspan – the capacity to remain fully healthy, active, and productive, both mentally and physically cognition – general intellectual capacities, such as memory, deductive an...
Folksonomies: transhumanism
Folksonomies: transhumanism
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From Nick Bostrom's "Why I Want to be a Posthuman When I Grow Up"

20 JUN 2014 by ideonexus

 Transcription Fluency

When you write something down, either while taking notes or while trying to write your own original thoughts, you’re dealing with what literacy scholars call “transcription fluency”: How quickly and fluidly you can get down — “transcribe” — the stuff that’s in your head. One of the reasons we formally teach handwriting to young children is that you don’t want a bottleneck between the ideas they’re forming and the writing. If you struggle with the act of forming let...
Folksonomies: writing medium
Folksonomies: writing medium
  1  notes
 
17 AUG 2013 by ideonexus

 Zhodani Religion

Death, to the Zhodani, is not a complete ending. The "evil" (that is, failure of duty) of the individual spirit will be lost. The "good" of the spirit will merge for a time with the universal energy field, the Tavrian, and then return to another member of the race. The more dutiful the spirit, the more personality (and possibly even memory) will remain; this resembles reincarcation. An undutiful spirity will be diminished in proportion to its failures. However, actual demotion on the "chain o...
  1  notes

Interesting concept, that our good survives to live more lifetimes, while our bad dies with us. The more good, the more of us to continue, while the more bad, the less we will exist. Similar to evolution, where our good survives into future generations.

30 JUN 2013 by ideonexus

 The Past and Who Has Access to It

What we know about the past—and who has access to such knowledge—has changed dramatically with each such change. The changes run far deeper than the mere proliferation of data points. As written records of large estates held in monasteries in France achieved legal and social dominance, the role of women as the tellers of the past fell into decline (Geary, 1994): The technological and the social were deeply intertwined. The outcome was that different kinds of records were kept. With the in...
Folksonomies: history heirarchy
Folksonomies: history heirarchy
  1  notes

The past was once only available through memory, then only available to those who had access to records, and now available to everyone.

03 MAY 2013 by ideonexus

 keyframe

n. a moment that seemed innocuous at the time but ended up marking a diversion into a strange new era of your life—set in motion not by a series of jolting epiphanies but by tiny imperceptible differences between one ordinary day and the next, until entire years of your memory can be compressed into a handful of indelible images—which prevents you from rewinding the past, but allows you to move forward without endless buffering.
Folksonomies: meaning perception time
Folksonomies: meaning perception time
  1  notes

A moment that marks a transition in our lives, but really serves as a signifier for a long gradual change.

16 APR 2013 by ideonexus

 Neem: Cognitive Drug

Neem is a mnemonic drug that works by “tagging” experiences and mental input with a set of unique sensations that contribute to the formation of state-based memories. Neem gummy chews come in a variety of fruit avors shaped like extinct old Earth animals. Neem gives characters a 20 bonus on COG Tests to recall information they learned while on Neem (see Memorizing and Remembering, p. 176). The drawback to Neem is that memories they accumulate while under the drug’s in uence have no em...
Folksonomies: tagging cognition
Folksonomies: tagging cognition
  1  notes

A drug that "tags" experiences and ideas with a set of unique sensations to link to a memory. One could then take another dose of Neem to recall the memory.

23 MAR 2013 by ideonexus

 You Can Choose Your Memories

In the earliest days of research, memory was thought to be populated with socalled engrams, memory traces that were localized in specific parts of the brain. To locate one such engram—for the memory of a maze—psychologist Karl Lashley taught rats to run through a labyrinth. He then cut out various parts of their brain tissue and put them right back into the maze. Though the rats’ motor function declined and some had to hobble or crawl their way woozily through the twists and turns, the ...
Folksonomies: memory mindfulness
Folksonomies: memory mindfulness
  1  notes

We can cognitively choose what memories will be stored longterm and which to let go, but we normally operate on autopilot, allowing novelties into our longterm memory-space.